Is the Fuji X-T2 better than the X-T1? Review

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: is the X-T2 better?
Review



Is the Fuji X-T2 better than the X-T1? Should you consider an upgrade? We analysed the key specifications and performance tests to help you decide.

Among the key improvements Fuji made in the X-T2 are a new X-Trans III CMOS sensor, offering a boost in resolution from 16.3 megapixels to 24.3 megapixels, support for 4K video recording and a customisable autofocus system with up to 325 focus points (an increase from 49) and greater frame coverage.

But there is much more. Let’s take look at both the Fuji X-T2 and X-T1 spec sheets side-by-side…

Fuji X-T2 Specs

Camera Name Fujifilm X-T2
Camera type CSC
Date announced 7th July 2016
Price at launch £1,399/$TBC (body only)
Sensor size APS-C (23.6 x 15.6mm)
Effective pixel count 24.3 million
Processor X Processor Pro
Lens/Mount X
Viewfinder 0.5-inch OLED with 2,360,000 dots
Sensitivity range ISO 200-12,800 expandable to ISO 100-51,200
Reflex AF system N/A
Live View AF system Hybrid with up to 325 points
Monitor Dual-tilting 3-inch LCD with 1,040,000 dots
Max shooting rate Electronic shutter 14fps, Mechanical shutter 8fps or 11fps with VPB
Max video resolution 4K (3840×2160)
Storage 2 SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-I/UHS-II)
Dimensions 132.5 x 91.8 x 49.2mm
Weight 457g (body only), 507g with battery and card

Fuji X-T1 Specs

Camera Name Fujifilm X-T1
Camera type CSC
Date announced 28th Jan 2014
Price at launch £1,049.99/$1,299.95 (body only)
Sensor size APS-C (23.6 x 15.6mm)
Effective pixel count 16.3 million
Processor EXR Processor II
Lens/Mount X
Viewfinder 0.5-inch OLED with 2,360,000 dots
Sensitivity range ISO 200-6400 expandable to ISO 100-51,200
Reflex AF system N/A
Live View AF system Hybrid with up to 49 points
Monitor Tilting 3-inch LCD with 1,040,000 dots
Max shooting rate 8fps
Max video resolution Full HD (1920 x 1080)
Storage SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II)
Dimensions 129 x 89.8 x 46.7mm
Weight 440g (body only), 390g with battery and card

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: 4K Video

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: 4K Video

After the X-Pro2 was launched earlier this year without support for 4K video, enabling the X-T2 with the capability became the day’s big headline. The Fuji X-T2 can shoot 3840 x 2160 4K video footage as well as Full HD, and Fuji has made it easy to make a film, giving the camera a Quick 4K movie option.

Recording time, however, is limited to 10 minutes, but you can extend this to up to 30 minutes if you buy Fuji’s Vertical Power Booster, announced at the same time (£299).

The Fuji X-T1 cannot record 4K video, of course, topping out at Full HD footage.

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: F-Log gamma

Another new addition for videographers is an F-Log gamma option, which takes advantage of the sensor’s wider dynamic range to record a broader tones and colour gamut.

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: Film Simulation mode

The Fuji X-T1 offers photographers the opportunity to shoot still images in the style of old Fujifilm like Velvia. For the first time with the X-T2, however, Fuji has enabled photographers to record movies using these Film Simulation modes – even in 4K.

There are nine modes available with the X-T2, and users can further fine-tune their Film Simulation footage with new Highlight Tone, Shadow Tone, Colour and Sharpness controls.

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: Autofocus

While 4K video recording made most of the headlines, perhaps the most significant changes in the Fuji X-T2 vs the X-T1 can be found in the camera’s hybrid AF system. As well as the increase in focus points, photographers can take greater control and customise the response of the Fuji X-T2 in its continuous AF mode, using three different focus tracking settings to respond to different types of subject movement.

Speed Tracking Sensitivity, Tracking Sensitivity and Zone Area Switching are all tailored for different shooting situations, and photographers can use these with five preset combinations.

Tracking Sensitivity lets you control the speed at which the X-T2 adjusts to changes in how far the subject is from you, while Speed Tracking Sensitivity lets you control how the camera adjusts to changes in your subject’s velocity. Zone Area Switching, meanwhile, allows you to prioritise a focus area within the frame, giving you three options: Centre, Auto and Front.

For a detailed breakdown of how these tracking settings work, read our Hands-on Fuji X-T2 Review.

Lastly, Fuji has included a dedicated control for setting the AF point on the X-T2. On the back of the camera is a new Focus Lever which takes the form of a joystick. Simply use this to toggle to your desired AF point. As we point out in our hands-on Fuji X-T2 review, it sits quite conveniently under your thumb when holding the camera to your eye.

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: Viewfinder

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: Viewfinder

The Fuji X-T1 had a very nice viewfinder… so nice, in fact, Fuji has included again here, although with some tweaks that make it even better!

Both the Fuji X-T2 and X-T1 feature 2.36-million-dot OLED EVFs, Fuji claims to have improved its performance with a 100fps refresh rate in Boost mode (60fps in Normal mode) compared to 54fps in the X-T1.

What’s more, the company says the X-T2 viewfinder offers lower moire patterning and gives a 1-stop better performance in low light. Brightness has also been increased, while blackout time has been cut in half that of the X-T1.

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: Body design

Like its predecessor, the Fuji X-T2 boasts a metal, weather-sealed body with a slightly more enhanced grip than the X-T1. On the camera’s top plate, the shutter speed and ISO dials have been made taller and now employ a lock button.

And while the Fuji X-T2 uses the same 3in 1.04-million-dot screen as the X-T1, it’s now housed on a three-directional tilting bracket, the first ever in an X Series camera from Fuji.

Fuji X-T2 vs X-T1: Conclusion

While on the surface the differences may seem subtle beyond the headline-grabbing addition of 4K video, Fuji’s enhancements of the X-T2 introduce a number of features and luxuries that can make the photographer’s life much easier.

From its more powerful AF system and the control given to the user, to what could prove to be the best EVF on the market, the Fuji X-T2 packs a lot of technology into its small dust- and moisture-proof body.