Buyers Guides |Which cameras have IBIS?

The Buyers guide to...Which cameras have IBIS?

These are the cameras with IBIS, or in-body image stabilization, which you can count on for stable, shake-free images and videos

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II
Buyers Guide

With the official launch of the Canon EOS R5 and EOS R6, in-body image stabilization, or IBIS, is the question on everyone’s lips. But what is this technology and which cameras have IBIS?

The Canon EOS R6 and EOS R5 are impressive cameras indeed, but they are not the first cameras with IBIS. In fact, it was Konica Minolta (which was later acquired by Sony) that first introduced sensor stabilization technology.

In 2003, the Minolta DiMAGE A1 was released which introduced Anti-Shake technology that physically shifted its CCD sensor along the X and Y axes to provide image stabilization.

So what exactly is in-body image stabilization technology and what does it do? Read on to find out which cameras have IBIS.

What is IBIS?

IBIS is an acronym for in-body image stabilization. It’s a relatively new technology within cameras that aims to stabilise your sensor to provide both stable, shake-free video footage and sharp still images when shooting handheld at longer shutter speeds.

IBIS, also known as sensor shift technology, works by physically moving the sensor inside your camera to compensate for camera movement. Built-in gyroscopes and accelerometers are able to calculate the motion and rotation of your camera and move the sensor accordingly to keep the image stable.

What is 5-axis image stabilisation?

Many cameras with IBIS have what is called 5-axis image stabilization. This means that your camera has built-in gyroscopes that provide stabilization along five axes: yaw, pitch, roll, horizontal and vertical.

Yaw is when your camera twists left or right on a vertical axis. Rotation on the front-to-back maxi is called roll. Rotation from side to side is called pitch.

Current cameras that feature IBIS

In this guide we’ve listed out all of the current cameras on the market that feature in-body image stabilisation. Some manufacturers, such as Sony and Olympus, have featured this technology in previous generations of popular models such as the A7 series cameras. Given the unpredictability in finding some of these older cameras, we’ve listed out which cameras have IBIS that we know are readily available.

For a deeper dive into the many different camera types and features available, check out our range of camera buying guides.

Which Canon cameras have IBIS?

When Canon announced the EOS R5 and EOS R6 in July 2020, they were the first Canon cameras to offer in-body image stabilisation. As Canon’s EOS R system grows, it seems likely we will see more cameras with IBIS.

Canon EOS R5

Canon EOS R5 review

Specification

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 9th July 2020
  • Sensor: 45Mp Full-frame Dual Pixel CMOS AF II
  • Processor: Digic X
  • Lens mount: RF
  • Sensitivity range: Stills: ISO 100-51,200 expandable to ISO 50-102,400, Movies: ISO 100-25600, expandable to ISO ISO 51,200
  • Metering: 384-zone metering with Evaluative metering (linked to All AF points), Partial metering (approx. 6.1% of viewfinder at centre), Spot metering: Centre spot metering (approx. 3.1% viewfinder at centre), Centre weighted average metering
  • Shutter speed range: 1/8000sec-30 seconds and Bulb
  • File formats: Raw + Jpeg/HEIF, MP4
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter: 12fps, Electronic shutter: 20fps
  • Maximum video resolution: Uncropped, internal raw recording 8K video at up to 29.97fps in 4:2:2 10-bit in Canon Log (H.265) or 4:2:2 10-bit HDR PQ (H.265), Uncropped internal recording 4K video at up to 119.88fps in 4:2:2 10-bit in Canon Log (H.265) or 4:2:2 10-bit HDR PQ (H.265) 4:2:2 10-bit in Canon Log or 4:2:2 10-bit HDR PQ, 4K output over HDMI at up to 59.94fps
  • Autofocus system: Dual Pixel CMOS AF II phase detection with 5940 points in stills and 4500 points in movie mode
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 5.76million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder with 120fps display and 0.76x magnification
  • Screen: 3.15-inch 2.1-million dot vari-angle touchscreen
  • Autofocus: Dual Pixel CMOS AF II with Advanced Animal AF (recognising dogs, cats and birds) supported in all video modes with 100% coverage and up to 1053 'AF segments'
  • Stabilisation: In-body image stabilisation (IBIS) that works with lens IS and enables up to 8-stops of shutter speed compensation
  • Storage: Dual slots, 1x CFexpress, 1x SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions: 135.8 x 97.5 x 88mm
  • Weight: 650 g / 738 g with card and battery

In-body images stabilisation (IBIS) is now an expected feature and although Canon has previously relied upon lens-based stabilisation, the EOS R5 has 5 axis IBIS.

It also steals the IS crown with a claimed shutter speed compensation of 8Ev. That’s the difference between 1/500 sec and 1.3sec!

The IBIS works in tandem with any lens stabilisation to deliver the best result possible. This is facilitated by the improved communication between the lens and camera body which is made possible by the RF mount’s 12-pin connection.

Price when reviewed
£4199
$3899
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For

  • 45Mp full-frame sensor with full AF coverage
  • 12fps/20fps continuous shooting with continuous AF
  • Uncropped internal 8K video recording for up to 20 minutes

Against

  • 8K video will require lots of storage capacity

Canon EOS R6

Canon EOS R6

Specification

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 9th July 2020
  • Sensor: 20Mp Full-frame Dual Pixel CMOS AF II
  • Processor: Digic X
  • Lens mount: RF
  • Sensitivity range: Stills: ISO 100-102,400 expandable to ISO 50-204,800, Movies: ISO 100-6,400, expandable to ISO 204,800
  • File formats: Raw + Jpeg/HEIF, MP4
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter: 12fps, Electronic shutter: 20fps
  • Maximum video resolution: 4K video at up to 60fps, Full HD at up to 120fps. 4K video crop: 1.07x at 25p (1.19x with the Digital IS on), 1.52x at 60p
  • Autofocus system: Dual Pixel CMOS AF II phase detection with 6,072 points in stills and 4968 points in movie mode
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 3.69million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder with 120fps refresh rate
  • Screen: 3-inch 1.62-million dot vari-angle touchscreen
  • Autofocus: Dual Pixel CMOS AF II with Advanced Animal AF (recognising dogs, cats and birds) supported in all video modes with 100% coverage and up to 1053 'AF segments'
  • Stabilisation: In-body image stabilisation (IBIS) that works with lens IS and enables up to 8-stops of shutter speed compensation
  • Storage: Dual slots, 2x SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions: 138.4 x 97.5 x 88.4mm
  • Weight: 598g / 680 g with card and battery

Like the EOS R5, the new Canon EOS R6 also boasts in-body image stabilisation. The R6 is also Canon’s low-light maestro.

While the R5’s AF system is claimed to be sensitive down to -6EV, the R6’s AF system can function at down to -6.5EV. That’s incredibly low light and a new record for a Canon EOS camera.

Shooting in dim conditions can also necessitate slow shutter speeds, but that’s OK because the Canon R6 has 5-axis in-body image stabilisation built-in.

This works in harmony with the stabilisation in Canon’s IS lenses and is claimed to offer up to 8 stops of shutter speed compensation. That’s a new high for the photographic industry.

The autofocus and stabilisation specifications are extremely promising in this camera, and the Canon EOS R6 should prove extremely popular with photographers.

Price when reviewed
£2500
€2899.99
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For

  • Similar 20Mp full-frame sensor to the Canon EOS 1D X Mark III
  • 12fps/20fps continuous shooting
  • Superb autofocus system

Against

  • Slight crop in 4K video mode
  • 6Mp lower resolution than the Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • Serious heat generation issues with 4K video

Canon EOS R3

Canon EOS R3

Specification

  • Camera Type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 14th September 2021
  • Sensor: 24.1Mp Full-frame BSI stacked CMOS
  • Processor: Digic X
  • Lens mount: RF
  • Sensitivity range: Stills: ISO 100-102,400 expandable to ISO 50-204,800, Video: ISO 100-25,600 expandable to 100-102,400
  • Metering: 384-zone metering with Evaluative metering (linked to All AF points), Partial metering (approx. 5.9% of viewfinder at centre), Spot metering: Centre spot metering (approx. 2.9% viewfinder at centre), Centre weighted average metering
  • Shutter speed range: Mechanical shutter: 30- 1/8,000 sec and Bulb, Electronic shutter: 30-1/64,000 sec
  • Still file formats: Raw + Jpeg/HEIF
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter / 1st curtain electronic: 12fps for 1000+ Jpeg or 1000 raw, Electronic shutter: 30fps for 540 Jpegs or 150 raw images
  • Main video resolutions: 6K DCI (17:9) 6000 x 3164 (59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, 24, 23.98fps) raw, 4K DCI (17:9) 4096 x 2160 (59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, 24, 23.98fps) intra or inter frame / light inter frame 4K UHD (16:9) 3840 x 2160 (119.9, 100, 59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, 23.98 fps) intra or inter frame Full HD (16:9) 1920 x 1080 (119.9, 100, 59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, 23.98 fps) intra or inter frame Full HD (16:9) 1920 x 1080 HDR (29.97, 25 fps) inter frame
  • Video conatiner formats: MP4, raw (CRM)
  • Colour sampling: 6K raw 12bit, 4K/ Full HD - 4:2:0 8-bit or 4:2:2 10bit
  • Log: Canon Log 3
  • Autofocus system: Dual Pixel CMOS AF II phase detection with 1,053 points
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 5.76million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder with 120fps display and 0.76x magnification
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 4.15-million dot vari-angle touchscreen
  • Stabilisation: In-body image stabilisation (IBIS) that works with lens IS and enables up to 8-stops of shutter speed compensation
  • Storage: Dual slots, 1x CFexpress, 1x SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions: 150x 142.6 x 87.2mm
  • Weight: 822g body only, 1015g with card and battery

The Canon EOS R3 has a 5-axis system that works in stills and movie mode. It can also work in harmony with stabilised Canon RF lenses to provide a shutter speed compensation of up to 8EV. That’s the difference between 1/250sec and 1sec.

Because the Canon R3’s image stabilisation system works in video mode as well as when shooting stills, it makes handheld footage rock-steady. In our tests, we found that our handheld footage looked like we had mounted the camera on a tripod.

Overall, the Canon EOS R3 is another significant stride forward in the development of mirrorless cameras, offering the type of features and build quality that will appeal to professional sports and news photographers. It’s expensive, but it’s a very powerful camera.

Price when reviewed
£5880
$5999 / €6689.99
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For

  • 24Mp full-frame sensor with full AF coverage
  • 12fps/30fps continuous shooting with continuous AF
  • Eye Control AF

Against

  • 6K raw video requires lots of storage capacity
  • Control layout different from EOS-1D X mark III and existing R-series cameras
  • Less durable buttons than on the 1D X III

Canon EOS R7

Canon EOS R7 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 24th May 2022
  • Sensor: 32.5Mp APS-C format (22.3 x 14.8mm) CMOS
  • Processor: Digic X
  • Lens mount: Canon RF
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 100-32,000 expandable to ISO 51,200
  • AF system: Dual Pixel CMOS II AF phase detection with up to 5915 positions and 651 automatically selectable points
  • Subject detection and tracking: Humans (Eyes/Face/Head/Body), Animals (Dogs, Cats and Birds) or Vehicles (Racing cars or Motor bikes)
  • Viewfinder: 0.39-type 2,360,000-dots OLED EVF
  • Screen: Touch-sensitive vari-angle 2.95-inch LCD with 1.62 million dots
  • Video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) at up to 60p, Full HD: (1920 x 1080) at up to 120p
  • Max continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter: 15fps for up to 224 Jpegs or 51 raw files, Electronic shutter: 30fps for 126 Jpegs or 42 raw files
  • Shutter speed range: Mechanical: 30-1/8000 sec, Bulb, Electronic: 30-1/16000 sec
  • Built-in flash: No
  • Battery: Li-ion LP-E6N, Viewfinder: Approx. 500 shots Screen: Approx 770 shots
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 132.0 x 90.4 x 91.7mm
  • Weight: 612g including battery and memory card

The EOS R5 and R6 were the first of Canon’s cameras to offer in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) and now the R7 offers it too. Canon’s new flagship APS-C mirrorless camera corrects camera shake across 5 axis for video and stills and gives up to 8EV shutter speed compensation and with the new RF-S 18-150mm f3.5-6.3 IS STM kit lens it gives up to 7EV compensation.

The IBIS in the R7 also enables another neat trick, horizon correction. This is a feature that is activated via the menu and it uses the sensor’s ability to move to correct a sloping horizon. You can see its impact in the viewfinder and on the screen on the back of the camera.

Because Canon is pitching the R7 as a hybrid camera, the ability to handhold while you film should be a real advantage for vloggers and content creators.

Price when reviewed
£1350
€1649.99

For

  • Phase detection focusing and intelligent subject detection
  • 32.5MP APS-C sensor
  • Same mount as Canon R3, R5 and R6

Against

  • Limited RF-S lens range

Which Sony cameras have IBIS?

Many of Sony’s expansive Alpha range and A7 series cameras offer impressive stabilisation. The following Sony cameras all boast IBIS which, in our tests, have proven capable of excellent results.

Sony A7 IV

Sony A7 IV review

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless
  • Announced: 21st October 2021
  • Sensor: 33Mp full frame (35.9 x 24.0mm) BSI Exmor R CMOS sensor
  • Lens mount: FE
  • Sensitivity range: Stills: ISO 100-51,200 (expandable to ISO 50 to ISO 204,800), Video: ISO ISO 100-51,200 (expandable to ISO 100-102,400)
  • Still Image format: Jpeg, HEIF, raw (Sony ARW 4.0)
  • Video format & compression: XAVC S: MPEG-4 AVC/H.264, XAVC HS: MPEG-H HEVC/H.265
  • 4K Video (XAVC HS): 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 10bit, NTSC): 60p (150 Mbps / 75 Mbps / 45 Mbps), 24p (100 Mbps / 50 Mbps / 30 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 10bit, PAL): 50p (150 Mbps / 75 Mbps / 45 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, NTSC): 60p (200 Mbps / 100 Mbps), 24p (100 Mbps / 50 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, PAL): 50p (200 Mbps / 100 Mbps)
  • 4K Video (XAVC S): 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 8bit, NTSC): 60p (150 Mbps), 30p (100 Mbps / 60 Mbps), 24p (100 Mbps / 60 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 8bit, PAL): 50p (150 Mbps)5, 25p (100 Mbps / 60 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, NTSC): 60p (200 Mbps)56, 30p (140 Mbps), 24p (100 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, PAL): 50p (200 Mbps)5, 25p (140 Mbps)
  • 4K Video (XAVC S-I): 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, NTSC): 60p (600 Mbps)56, 30p (300 Mbps)6, 24p (240 Mbps), 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, PAL): 50p (500 Mbps)5, 25p (250 Mbps)
  • Movie functions: Audio Level Display, Audio Rec Level, PAL/NTSC Selector, Proxy Recording (1280 x 720 (Approx. 6 Mbps), 1920 x 1080 (Approx. 9 Mbps), 1920 x 1080 (Approx. 16 Mbps)), TC/UB, Auto Slow Shutter, Gamma Disp. Assist
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid AF with 759 phase detection points and 425 contrast detection points, Still images: Human (Right/Left Eye Select) / Animal (Right/Left Eye Select) / Bird, Movie: Human (Right/Left Eye Select), sensitive down to -4EV
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 3,686,400-dot EVF with 100% coverage and up to 0.78x magnification
  • Screen: 3-inch 1,036,800-dot vari-angletouchscreen
  • Image stabilisation: 5-axis giving up to 5.5EV compensation
  • Storage: Dual: 1: SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-I/II) & CFexpress Type A slot, 2: SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-I/II)
  • Battery: NP-FZ100 rechargeable Li-ion battery giving 610 images with the screen
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 131.3 x 96.4 x 79.8mm / 5 1/4 x 3 7/8 x 3 1/4 inches
  • Weight (including battery & memory card): 658g / 1 lb 7.3 oz

The Sony A7 IV makes a solid upgrade on the A7 III. In fact, it’s one of those rare cameras that makes a significant enough jump to warrant upgrading from one generation to the next.

Among its improvements over the A7 III, Sony claims a 5.5 EV shutter speed compensation factor for the A7 IV. This is a half-stop improvement.

Shooting with the Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8GM lens mounted and at the 70mm end during our tests, we were able to get about 20% of our images completely sharp at 100% on a computer screen when using a shutter speed of 1-second. That’s a compensation factor of around 6EV.

Dropping to a shutter speed of 1/2-second raised our hit rate to about 40% while at 1/4-sec the hit rate was about 60-70%.

What’s more, the A7 IV also has an ‘Active Mode’ that is designed for use when shooting video and crops the image slightly.

Price when reviewed
£2400
$2498
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For

  • Good combination of speed and resolution
  • Vari-angle touchscreen
  • Excellent AF system

Against

  • CFexpress Type A card required to get the full feature range
  • Video options could be clearer
  • Super 35 crop for 4K video at 60p

Sony A7 III

Specification

  • Announced: 26th February 2018
  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless
  • Sensor: 24.2Mp Full frame (35.6×23.8mm), Exmor R CMOS sensor
  • Processor: Bionz X
  • Lens mount: Sony E
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 50-204,800
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps with full AF and metering
  • Maximum video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160)
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 693 phase detection points and 425 contrast detection points
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch OLED with 2,359,296 dots
  • Screen: 3-inch 921,600-dot tilting touchscreen
  • Storage: Dual Slot, Slot 1: SD (UHS-I/II), Slot 2: Multi slot for Memory Stick Duo/SD (UHS-I)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 126.9 x 95.6 x 73.7mm
  • Weight: 650g

The Sony A7 III is an impressive all-rounder camera. Among its impressive features is Sony’s 5-axis optical in-body image stabilisation, which gives a 5EV extension to your hand-holdable shutter speed.

In our tests we found the A7 III’s stabilisation was superb, allowing us to capture handheld shots that otherwise would have suffered from camera shake.

What’s more, its fast and silent shooting credentials, clever autofocusing and 4K video capability make it a great choice. It also produces high-quality results and Sony has a growing range of high-quality optics, adding to its appeal.

Price when reviewed
£1699
$1999
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For

  • Good-quality 24Mp full-frame sensor
  • Excellent autofocus system
  • Attractively priced in the full-frame market

Against

  • Minimal use of the screen's touch-sensitivity
  • Tilting rather than vari-angle screen
  • Complex menu

Sony A7R IV

Sony A7R Mark IV: price, specs, release date confirmed

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless
  • Announced: 16th July 2019
  • Sensor: 61MP BSI full-frame sensor
  • Lens mount: Sony FE
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 567 phase detection + 425 contrast detection AF points
  • Continuous Shooting: 10fps burst shooting with full AF / AE Tracking
  • Video: 4K video with S-Log2/3, HDR
  • Sensitivity range: Still images: ISO 100-32000 (expandable to ISO 50 to ISO 102400) Movies: ISO 100-32000
  • Viewfinder: 0.5 type 5,760,000-dot OLED
  • Screen: Tilting 3-inch 1,440,000-dot touchscreen
  • Storage: 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Battery: Rechargeable NP-FZ100 battery supplied, Life Stills: 530 shots (viewfinder) / 670 shots (LCD), Movies: 90mins (viewfinder) / 105mins (LCD)
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 128.9 x 96.4 x 77.5mm
  • Weight: 665 g / 1lb 7.5oz with battery and SD card

The Sony A7R Mark IV’s 61-million-pixel 35mm sensor is a world first, which the company says delivers ‘medium format quality’.

The sensor is back-side illuminated, and it provides 15 stops of dynamic range. As well as 61-megapixel images, the Sony A7R Mark IV can also produce images with 26 million pixels in APS-C crop mode.

What’s more, its revampled Pixel Shift Multi-Shooting mode can produce images at 240-megapixel resolution. It does this by capturing 960 megapixels worth of data from 16 images, which it then composites together using Sony’s Imaging Edge software.

The A7R Mark IV boasts 567 phase-detection AF points in full-frame mode, which cover 74% of the frame. In the camera’s APS-C mode it has 325 AF points which then cover nearly the entire frame. There’s also Sony’s excellent AI-driven Real-time Eye AF (for humans and animals ins stills mode) and Real-time Tracking modes, which is invaluable for portrait, wedding, sport, pet and social photography.

Depsite its high resolution, the Sony A7R IV is also built for speed and can capture full-resolution 61-megapixel images in continuous shooting mode at up to 10fps, and up to 68 images per continuous burst.

Also among its key features is 5.5-stop, 5-axis in-body image stabilisation, wireless tethering capability, faster USB connection, 802.11ac Wi-Fi plus Bluetooth and studio lighting support.

It all adds up to make the Sony A7R IV one of the best cameras available right now.

Find the best deals on the Sony A7R IV at Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Price when reviewed
£3500
$3500
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For

  • Superb detail resolution
  • Excellent autofocus system
  • High-resolution electronic viewfinder

Against

  • Limited use made the touch-control
  • Tilting rather than vari-angle scree
  • High price

Sony A7S III

Sony A7S III

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless
  • Announced: 28th July 2020
  • Sensor: Full-frame 12.1Mp BSI CMOS
  • Processing engine: Bionz XR
  • Sensitivity: Video: ISO 80-102,400 expandable ISO 40-409,600. ISO base in S-Log is ISO 640 but it can be expanded down to ISO 160. Stills: ISO 80-102,400 expandable 40-409,600
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 759 phase detection points and 425 contrast detection points, Real Time Eye AF (Human and Animal for stills, Human for video)
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis IBIS and digital, up to 5.5EV shutter speed compensation
  • Video resolution: 4K at up 120fps and 1080p at 240fps, 10-bit and 4:2:2 colour, 16-bit raw video over HDMI
  • Video file formats: XAVC S,XAVC HS
  • Video compression: XAVC S: MPEG-4 AVC/H.264, XAVC HS: MPEG-H HEVC/H.265
  • 4K Video details: XAVC HS 4K 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 10bit, NTSC): 120p (200Mbps), 60p (150Mbps / 75Mbps / 45Mbps), 24p (100Mbps / 50Mbps / 30Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 10bit, PAL): 100p (200Mbps), 50p (150Mbps / 75Mbps / 45Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, NTSC): 120p (280Mbps), 60p (200Mbps / 100Mbps), 24p (100Mbps / 50Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, PAL): 100p (280Mbps), 50p (200Mbps / 100Mbps) XAVC S 4K 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 8bit, NTSC): 120p (200Mbps), 60p (150Mbps), 30p (100Mbps / 60Mbps), 24p (100Mbps / 60Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:0, 8bit, PAL): 100p (200Mbps), 50p (150Mbps), 25p (100Mbps / 60Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, NTSC): 120p (280Mbps), 60p (200Mbps), 30p (140Mbps), 24p (100Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, PAL): 100p (280Mbps), 50p (200Mbps), 25p (140Mbps) XAVC S-I 4K 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, NTSC) (Approx.): 60p (600Mbps), 30p (300Mbps), 24p (240Mbps); 3840 x 2160 (4:2:2, 10bit, PAL): 50p (500Mbps), 25p (250Mbps)
  • Gamut: S-Log2 and S-Log3, S-Gamut3.Cine and S-Gamut3
  • Slow and Quick (S&Q) mode options: NTSC: 1fps,2fps,4fps,8fps,15fps,30fps,60fps,120fps, 240fps4, PAL: 1fps,2fps,3fps,6fps,12fps,25fps,50fps,100fps, 200fps
  • Still File formats: Raw, JPG, HEIF
  • Screen: 3-inch 1,440,000-dot vari-angle touchscreen
  • Viewfinder: 0.64-inch type 9,437,184-dot OLED electronic viewfinder, with refresh rate up to 120fps, adjustable magnification up to 0.9x
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps with mechanical or electronic shutter for up to 1000 uncompressed raw files when a CFexpress Type 1 card is used
  • Storage: Dual: SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II) and CFexpress Type A
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 128.9 x 96.9 x 80.8mm / 5 1/8 x 3 7/8 x 3 1/4 inches
  • Weight: 699g / 1 lb 8.7 oz

Like the A7S II, the Sony A7S III has 5-axis image stabilisation built-in. This is claimed to offer up to 5.5EV shutter speed compensation when shooting stills. It’s also possible to activate digital stabilisation if it’s required. This is called SteadyShot Active and as you’d expect, using it results in a slight crop being applied to the framing.

The A7S III’s handling and control arrangement is also a major improvement upon the A7S II, but it’s also much better than any of Sony’s other cameras.

As good as the Sony A7S III is for experienced videographers, it’s good to see that it’s also capable of producing superb 4K video without using some of the advanced features. So if you don’t have an external monitor/recording device and you’re relatively new to grading Log files, you can still great great results.

Price when reviewed
£3800
€4200 / $3499
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For

  • Large pixels for great low-light performance
  • 4K full-pixel readout without binning and 10-bit depth 4:2:2 colour available in all recording formats
  • Vari-angle touchscreen and class-leading electronic viewfinder

Against

  • 12Mp seems low resolution for stills
  • Uses a new memory card format (CFexpress Type A) that's interchangeable with SD

Sony A6600

Sony A6600 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 28th August 2019
  • Lens mount: Sony E
  • Sensor: 24.2MP APS-C Exmor CMOS (23.5 x 15.6mm) sensor
  • Video: 4K (3840 x 2160) 25/30p video capture with log profiles
  • Continuous shooting rate: Hi+: 11fps, Hi: 8fps, Mid: 6fps, Lo: 3fps
  • Burst depth: In Hi+ 46 raw files, 99 Extra Fine Jpegs or 44 raw and Jpeg files
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis in-body image stabilisation
  • Sensitivity: ISO 100-32000 (expandable to ISO 50 – 102400)
  • Autofocus : Fast Hybrid AF (phase-detection and contrast-detection each with 425 points), Face Detection and Real-Time Eye AF
  • Viewfinder: 0.39-inch 2,359,296-dot OLED electronic viewfinder
  • Screen: 3-inch 921,600-dot tilting touchscreen
  • Storage: SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-I or Memory Stick PRO Duo, Memory Stick PRO-HG Duo, Memory Stick Micro (M2)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 120.0 x 66.9 x 69.3mm / 4 3/4 x 2 3/4 x 2 3/4-inches
  • Weight: 503g / 1lb 1.8oz with battery and memory card

The Sony A6600 is Sony’s flagship APS-C format mirrorless camera and it’s aimed at enthusiast photographers and videographers who want to shoot in a variety of conditions. It features a 24.2MP Exmor CMOS image sensor, the BIONZ X image processor and a front-end LSI as is implemented in Sony’s full-frame cameras for better enhancements in still and video image quality.

Among the A6600’s impressive feature set is Sony’s innovative 5-axis in-body image stabilisation system that provides a 5.0-step shutter speed advantage.

The Alpha 6600 also delivers an autofocus acquisition time of just 0.02 seconds, with 425 phase-detection AF points covering approximately 84% of the image area and 425 contrast-detection AF points.

Also on-board is Sony’s ‘Real-time Tracking’ and ‘Real-time Eye AF’, the latest version of Sony’s Eye AF technology, which employs AI-based object recognition to detect and process eye data in real-time.

Real-time Eye AF promises improved accuracy, speed and tracking performance of Eye AF for both humans and animals, and allows the photographer to concentrate exclusively on composition. It’s a significant bonus for pet and portrait photography.

High-resolution internal 4K movie recording with full-pixel readout without pixel binning in Super 35mm format is also on-board. You’ll also find built-in interval shooting for time-lapse videos and a 180-degree tiltable, 3.0-type 921k-dot (approx.) LCD touch screen.

It may not have the same shape as the Sony A7 series of full-frame cameras, but the A 6600 has much of the same technology, enabling it to deliver impressive results with a wide range of subjects.

Price when reviewed
£1450
€1600
Check current price

For

  • Very good image and video quality
  • Fast, accurate AF system
  • Excellent battery life (800+ shots)

Against

  • Poorly positioned video record button
  • Little use made of the touch control on the tilting rather than vari-angle screen
  • Single SD card slot

Which Nikon cameras have IBIS?

Nikon may have been late into the full-frame mirrorless market, but its Z series cameras offer superb in-body image stabilisation among a host of other features.

Nikon Z9

Nikon Z9 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless camera
  • Announced: 28th October 2021
  • Lens mount: Nikon Z
  • Sensor: Full-frame (FX 35.9 x 23.9mm) 45.7MP stacked backside illuminated (BSI) sensor
  • Processing engine: Expeed 7
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis sensor shift giving 6EV shutter speed compensation
  • Sensitivity: ISO 64-25,600, expandable to ISO 32-102,400
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 20fps for up to 1000+ raw (high efficiency) files or 685 raw (high efficiency *) files, 30fps for up to 1000+ normal-quality Jpegs, or 120fps normal-quality 11Mp Jpegs
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with phase and contrast detection
  • Phase detection points: 493
  • AF-area modes: Pinpoint (available in photo mode only), single-point, dynamic-area (S, M, and L; available in photo mode only), wide-area (S and L), and auto-area AF, 3D-tracking (available in photo mode only), subject-tracking AF (available in video mode only)
  • Video resolution: 8K (7680 x 4320): 30p (progressive)/25p/24p, 4K (3840 x 2160): 120p/100p/60p/50p/30p/25p/24p, Full HD (1920 x 1080): 120p/100p/60p/50p/30p/25p/24p
  • Video file format: MOV, MP4
  • Video compression: Apple ProRes 422 HQ (10 bit), H.265/HEVC (8 bit/10 bit), H.264/AVC (8 bit)
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 3.69-million-dot, 3,000-nit OLED viewfinder
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 2,100,000-dot 4-way-tilting touch-screen
  • Storage: Dual XQD/CFexpress
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 149 x 149.5 x 90.5 mm / 5.9 x 5.9 x 3.6 inches
  • Weight: 1340 g / 2 lb. 15.3 oz.with battery and memory card but without body cap and accessory shoe cover, Body only: 1160g / 2 lb. 9 oz.

Everyone is eagerly awaiting the arrival of the Nikon Z9 which, by all accounts, looks to be a beast of a camera. Amongst its many features is a sensor-shifting 5-axis in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) system that offers up to 6EV shutter speed compensation.

Once the Z9 is available for testing, we’ll update this section with some firsthand accounts of how it performs.

Price when reviewed
£5299
€6299

For

  • New 45.7Mp full-frame sensor sensor
  • Advanced AF system
  • Durable, weatherproof build

Against

  • No mechanical shutter
  • Firmware updates to come in 2022 to get the full video feature set

Nikon Z6 II

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless camera
  • Announced: 14th October 2020
  • Lens mount: Nikon Z
  • Sensor: Full-frame (FX 35.9 x 23.9mm) 24.5MP backside illuminated (BSI) sensor
  • Processing engine: Dual Expeed 6
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis in-body VR
  • Sensitivity: ISO 100-51,200, expandable to ISO 50-204,800
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 14fps for up to 200Jpegs or 124 12-bit uncompressed raw files
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with phase and contrast detection
  • Phase detection points: 273
  • Video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) 30/25/24p (60P to come with free firmware update in Feb 2021), Full-HD (1920 x 1080) 120/100/60/50/30/25/24p, Slow-motion mode 1920 x 1080 30p x4/25p x4/24p x5
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 3.69-million-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 2,100,000-dot tilting touch-screen
  • Storage: Dual slot 1 XQD/CFexpress and 1 SD/SDHC/SDXC
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 134 x 100.5 x 69.5mm / 5.3 x 4 x 2.8-inches
  • Weight: 705g with battery and memory card but without body cap, 615g body only

Although Nikon uses lens-based stabilisation (VR) for its DSLRs, it introduced 5-axis in-body stabilisation (VR) with the original Z6 and Z7. This continues with the Z6 II and there’s a claimed shutter speed compensation value of 5EV.

As the all-rounder of Nikon’s full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Z6 II has a lower resolution than the Z7 II, which means each pixel gathers more light. This means it is superb in low light conditions, and the in-body image stabilisation also aids this performance.

Overall, dual card slots, dual processors, 14fps shooting and eye AF for humans and animals in video mode might not be enough to tempt existing Nikon Z6 users to upgrade but they keep Nikon right in the heart of the mirrorless camera market. The Z6 II is a great camera and a very good all-rounder. Its solid build and well-thought control arrangement make it a pleasure to use.

Price when reviewed
£1999
€2262
Check current price

For

  • High-quality sensor
  • Excellent user interface and control layout
  • Weatherproof build

Against

  • Eye detection can be unreliable in video mode
  • Video Info menu not customisable
  • 4K 60fps shooting will incur a 1.5x crop factor

Nikon Z7 II

Nikon Z7 II price, specs, release date

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless camera
  • Announced: 14th October 2020
  • Lens mount: Nikon Z
  • Sensor: Full-frame (FX 35.9 x 23.9mm) 45.7MP backside illuminated (BSI) sensor
  • Processing engine: Dual Expeed 6
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis in-body VR
  • Sensitivity: ISO 64-25,600, expandable to ISO 32-102,400
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps for up to 200Jpegs or 77 12-bit uncompressed raw files, 9fps with 14-bit raw files
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with phase and contrast detection
  • Phase detection points: 493
  • Video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) 60/50/30/25/24p, Full-HD (1920 x 1080) 120/100/60/50/30/25/24p, Slow-motion mode 1920 x 1080 30p x4/25p x4/24p
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 3.69-million-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 2,100,000-dot tilting touch-screen
  • Storage: Dual slot 1 XQD/CFexpress and 1 SD/SDHC/SDXC
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 134 x 100.5 x 69.5mm / 5.3 x 4 x 2.8-inches
  • Weight: 705g with battery and memory card but without body cap, 615g body only

Nikon’s first full-frame mirrorless cameras introduced a new in-camera stabilisation system for the company. This corrects for accidental movement around 5 axis and offers up to 5EV of shutter speed compensation. It also works with VR (vibration reduction) systems in Nikon F-mount lenses mounted via an adapter.

Like the Z6 II, the Nikon Z7 II also retains the same 5-Axis in-body VR which is superb in practice. In our review, we were able to shoot with it set to ‘Normal’ rather than ‘Sport’, with the Nikkor Z 24-70mm f/4 S mounted and capture sharp hand-held images at shutter speeds around 5EV slower than normal with a hit rate of about 50%. That’s a significant bonus to anyone looking to shoot landscape or low-light images without carrying a tripod.

Price when reviewed
£2999
€3442 / $2996.95
Check current price

For

  • High-quality sensor
  • Excellent user interface and control layout
  • Weatherproof build

Against

  • A vari-angle screen is of more use than a tilting screen for portrait orientation images
  • The viewfinder resolution is no longer class-leading
  • The Eye-detection AF isn't a match for Sony's or Canon's most recent systems

Nikon Z6

Nikon Z6 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame (FX) mirrorless
  • Announced: 23rd August 2018
  • Lens mount: Nikon Z
  • Sensor: Full-frame (FX) 24.5Mp backside illuminated (BSI) sensor
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with phase and contrast detection
  • Phase detection points: 273
  • Viewfinder: 0.39-inch 2,360,000-dot OLED electronic viewfinder
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 2,100,000-dot tilting touch-screen
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 134 x 100.5 x 67.5mm / 5.3 x 4 x 2.7-inches
  • Weight: 675 g / 1 lb. 7.9 oz with battery and memory card but without body cap, 85 g/1 lb. 4.7 oz. camera body only

In a break from Nikon tradition, the Z6 has a built-in 5-axis stabilisation system, which gives 5EV of shutter speed compensation.

Using in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) avoids having to put Nikon’s VR system in the S-line (or Nikkor Z) lenses, which helps keep size, weight and prices down.

Like the A7 III on this list of cameras with IBIS, the Nikon Z6 is a great all-rounder. IBIS is just one of its signature features, and since its launch Nikon has even provided a firmware update enabling the camera to shoot raw video.

In short, the Z6 is a great price for a full-frame camera with so many features. I think that it’s the camera that many Nikon photographers have been holding out for.

It combines the handling that you expect from a Nikon DSLR with some great mirrorless camera advantages. The electronic viewfinder is superb, coming as close to an optical viewfinder as you could wish for.

Price when reviewed
£2079
$1996.95
Check current price

For

  • Superb quality images
  • Excellent weather-sealing and build quality
  • Growing range of very high-quality lenses

Against

  • Single memory card slot (XQD/CFexpress)
  • Lacklustre battery life
  • No Eye AF in video

Nikon Z7

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame mirrorless camera
  • Sensor: Full-frame (FX) 45.7MP backside illuminated (BSI) sensor
  • Lens mount: Nikon Z
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with phase and contrast detection
  • Phase detection points: 493
  • Storage: XQD/CFexpress
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 3.69-million-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 2,100,000-dot tilting touch-screen
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 134 x 100.5 x 67.5mm / 5.3 x 4 x 2.7-inches
  • Weight: 675 g / 1 lb. 7.9 oz with battery and memory card but without body cap, 585g/1 lb. 4.7 oz. body only

Nikon’s DSLRs use lens-based stabilisation, but its Z-series mirrorless cameras have it built into their bodies. It’s the 5 axis type and it’s designed to work with the VR in lenses mounted via an adapter.

In our tests – in both the Z7 and Z6 – we found the in-body image stabilisation to perform well and free you to shoot in situations when you’d normally need to use a tripod.

For instance, at the 70mm end of the Nikkor Z 24-70mm f/4 S, we were able to get consistently sharp images when hand-holding the camera at around 1/8-1/6sec. Some are sharp at 1/5sec. That’s when examining images at 100% on-screen.

Price when reviewed
£2299
$3399.00
Check current price

For

  • High-quality sensor
  • Excellent user interface and control layout
  • Weatherproof build

Against

  • Single XQD card port
  • Images slow to appear after shooting
  • Battery life could be better

Nikon Z5

Nikon Z5 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Full-frame (FX) mirrorless
  • Announced: 21st July 2020
  • Lens mount: Nikon Z
  • Sensor: 24.3Mp full-frame CMOS
  • Autofocus system: 273-point Hybrid (combines phase and contrast detection) with Eye AF for humans and animals
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis in body
  • Viewfinder: Electronic 0.39-inch 3,690,000-dot OLED
  • Screen: 3.2-inch 1,040,000-dot tilting touch-screen
  • Maximum video resolution: 4K (with 1.7x crop)
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 4.5fps
  • Storage: Dual SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Connectivity : Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, SnapBridge
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 134 x 100.5 x 69.5mm (5.3 x 4.0 x 2.8inches)
  • Weight: 590g/ 1 lb. 4.9 oz body only, 675g / 1 lb. 7.9 oz with battery and memory card but without body cap

Nikon has still embedded phase detection pixels on the Z5’s sensor and the hybrid AF system has a total of 273 user-selectable autofocus (AF) points.

Enticingly, there’s also Eye-Detection AF that is programmed to lock on to human eyes and Animal-Detection AF for getting cats’ and dogs’ eyes sharp.

Price when reviewed
£1719
€1999 / $1397
Check current price

For

  • Compact size and full-frame sensor
  • Nikon Z mount
  • Best in class viewfinder

Against

  • Maximum continuous shooting of 4.5fps (frames per second)
  • 1.7x crop applied to 4K video
  • 24-50mm kits lens is compact but has a limited zoom range

Which Panasonic cameras have IBIS?

Panasonic has positioned itself as a leader in video and hybrid shooting, and many of its Micro Four Thirds Lumix G series cameras, as well as its new full-frame S series cameras, offer in-body image stabilisation.

Panasonic Lumix GH6

Panasonic Lumix GH6 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Micro Four Thirds mirrorless
  • Announced: 22nd February 2022
  • Sensor: 25.21 Mp Live MOS Sensor (17.3 x 13mm)
  • Key video specs: 5.8K (5760x4320) (4:3) at 29.97p, 200Mbps (4:2:0 10-bit LongGOP) (H.265/HEVC, LPCM), 5.7K (5728x3024) (17:9) at 59.94p, 300Mbps (4:2:0 10-bit LongGOP) (H.265/HEVC, LPCM), 4.4K (4352x3264) (4:3) at 59.94p, 300Mbps (4:2:0 10-bit LongGOP) (H.265/HEVC, LPCM), 4.4K (4352x3264) (4:3) at 59.94p, 300Mbps (4:2:0 10-bit LongGOP) (H.265/HEVC, LPCM), 4K (3840x2160) at 119.88p, 300Mbps (4:2:0 10-bit LongGOP) (H.265/HEVC, LPCM), FHD (1920x1080) t 239.76p, 800Mbps (4:2:2 10-bit ALL-Intra) / 200Mbps (4:2:2 10-bit LongGOP) (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, LPCM
  • Video format: MOV: H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, H.265/HEVC, Apple ProRes MP4: H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, H.265/HEVC
  • Log Mode: V-Log L pre-installed
  • Sensitivity range: Stills (normal): ISO 100-25600 (expandable to ISO 50-25600), (V-Log) ISO 250-12800 (expandable to ISO 125-12800), Video: (Normal) Dynamic Range Boost OFF (Base ISO 100): Auto / 50 (Extended ISO) / 100-12800 Dynamic Range Boost ON (Creative Video Mode) (Base ISO 800): Auto / 800-12800 (V-Log) Dynamic Range Boost OFF (Base ISO 250): Auto / 125 (Extended ISO) / 250-12800 Dynamic Range Boost ON (Creative Video Mode) (Base ISO 2000): Auto / 2000-12800 (Hybrid Log Gamma) Dynamic Range Boost OFF (Base ISO 250): Auto / 250-12800 Dynamic Range Boost ON (Creative Video Mode) (Base ISO 2000): Auto / 2000-12800
  • AF system: Contrast detection with DFD
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis Dual IS II giving up to 7.5EV shutter speed compensation
  • Viewfinder: 3.68m-dot OLED with up to 120fps refresh rate
  • Touchscreen: 3-inch 1.84m-dot tilt & free-angle touchscreen
  • Storage: Dual slots, 1 CFexpress Type B, 1 UHS-II SD
  • Maximum stills continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter: H: 14 frames/sec (AFS/MF), 8 frames/sec (AFC) (with Live View) M: 6 frames/sec (AFS/MF) (with Live View), 5 frames/sec (AFC) (with Live View) L: 2 frames/sec (AFS/MF/AFC) (with Live View) Electronic shutter: SH75: 75 frames/sec (AFS/MF) SH60: 60 frames/sec (AFS/MF) SH20: 20 frames/sec (AFS/MF) H: 14 frames/sec (AFS/MF), 7 frames/sec (AFC) (with Live View) M: 6 frames/sec (AFS/MF) (with Live View), 5 frames/sec (AFC) (with Live View) L: 2 frames/sec (AFS/MF/AFC) (with Live View)
  • Dimensions (HxWxD): 100.3 x 138.4 x 99.6 mm (excluding protrusions)
  • Weight: 739g with SD card and battery

Panasonic has given the Lumix GH6 a new 5-axis gyro sensor with a new algorithm to deliver up to 7.5 stops of stabilisation by itself (Body I.S.) and Dual I.S.2.

The 5-axis Dual I.S. 2 applies appropriate compensation according to the type of movement by assessing the cause – panning, tilting, or hand-shake.

As usual, the Body.I.S. compensates for camera movement even when the mounted lens is not stabilised. In addition to the physical stabilisation system, the GH6 has digital stabilisation that can be used when recording video if you don’t mind a slight crop being applied to the framing.

The stabilisation system also enables a 100Mp High Resolution mode that can be used without a tripod.

When High Resolution mode is selected, the GH6 captures 8 images in succession while the sensor is shifted using the Body I.S. (Image Stabiliser) mechanism. These files are then composited into a 100Mp-equivalent (11552 x 8672-pixel) image that can be saved in raw and Jpeg format.

Price when reviewed
£2000
$2199.99 / €2199.99
Check current price

For

  • Extensive array of video features
  • Excellent stabilisation system
  • Excellent image quality for the sensor size

Against

  • Big & heavy for a Micro Four Thirds camera
  • AF system not up with the best

Panasonic Lumix GH5 II

Panasonic Lumix GH5 Mark II review

Specification

  • Camera type: Micro Four Thirds mirrorless
  • Announced: 25th May 2021
  • Sensor: 20.3 Mp Live MOS Sensor
  • Maximum video resolution: C4K (4096x2160)
  • Video Quality: 59.94p, 200Mbps (4:2:0 10-bit LongGOP) (H.265/HEVC, LPCM, High-Res Audio), 59.94p, 150Mbps (4:2:0 8-bit LongGOP) (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, LPCM, High-Res Audio), 29.97p, 400Mbps (4:2:2 10-bit ALL-Intra) / 150Mbps (4:2:2 10-bit LongGOP) / 100Mbps (4:2:0 8-bit LongGOP) (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, LPCM, High-Res Audio), 23.98p, 400Mbps (4:2:2 10-bit ALL-Intra) / 150Mbps (4:2:2 10-bit LongGOP) / 100Mbps (4:2:0 8-bit LongGOP) (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, LPCM, High-Res Audio)
  • Video format: MOV: H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, H.265/HEVC , MP4: H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, H.265/HEVC
  • Log Mode: V-Log L pre-installed
  • Sensitivity range: Stills: ISO 200-25600 (expandable to ISO 100-25600), Video: ISO 200-12800 (expandable to ISO 100-12800)
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis Dual IS II giving 6.5EV shutter speed compensation
  • Viewfinder: 3.68m-dot OLED with 60/120fps refresh rate
  • Touchscreen: 3-inch 1.84m-dot Free-angle touchscreen
  • Storage: Dual UHS-II SD slots
  • Maximum stills continuous shooting rate: AFS/MF: 12 frames/sec, AFC: H: 9 frames/sec (with Live View), 6K Photo: 30 frames/sec, 4K Photo: 60 frames/sec, 30 frames/sec
  • Dimensions: 138.5 x 98.1 x 87.4 mm / 5.45 x 3.86 x 3.44 inch (excluding protrusions)
  • Weight: 727g / 1.60 lb with SD card and battery

Like the Panasonic GH5 it replaces, the Lumix GH5 Mark II has in-body image stabilisation (IBIS). However, the IBIS has been further developed and is said to enable a shutter speed compensation of up to 6.5EV.

The GH5 II also uses an adapted version of the stabilisation algorithm used by the Panasonic S1H, for smoother, more stable video.

Building on the GH5, the GH5 II can record C4K (4095×2160) or 4K (3840×2160) video at 60p 4:2:0 10-bit to a compatible SD card until the card is full or the battery expires. It can also simultaneously output 4K 4:2:2 10-bit video to an HDMI connected device.

Internal recording is possible at up to 4K 60p and 4:2:2 10-bit 30p and there are 4K/6K Anamorphic modes. What’s more, the GH5M2 uses its whole sensor area for capturing video, so the footage is uncropped.

In addition, the Panasonic GH5M2 can live stream Full HD 60p video wirelessly via the Lumix Sync smartphone app or by connecting directly to a Wi-Fi router. A firmware update that’s scheduled to arrive before the end of 2021 will also add RTP/RTSP wired IP streaming.

This camera has only just been announced, and we’ll update this section with our view on how its IBIS performs at the conclusion of our review.

Price when reviewed
£1499
$2100
Check current price

For

  • Extensive array of features
  • Excellent stabilisation system
  • Simple live streaming via smartphone

Against

  • Large for a Micro Four Thirds camera
  • Insipid viewfinder image in the default settings
  • As yet we don't know how it compares with the GH6

Panasonic Lumix S5

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 2nd September 2020
  • Sensor: 24.2Mp full-frame (35.6 x 23.8mm) CMOS sensor
  • Lens mount: L
  • Construction: Magnesium alloy with dust and splash resistant seals
  • Stabilisation: 5 axis in-body IS to 5EV, 6.5 with Dual IS
  • Screen: 3-inch 1,840,000-dot vari-angle touchscreen
  • Viewfinder: 2,360,000-dot OLED electronic viewfinder with 0.74x magnification
  • Key video specifications: 4K (3840x2160) 4:2:2 10-bit LongGOP H.264 29.97/23.98p/25p and 150Mbps for up to 30mins, 4K (3840x2160) 4:2:0 8-bit LongGOP H.264 29.97/23.98p/25p and 100Mbps unlimited, Full HD (1920x1080) 4:2:2 10-bit LongGOP H.264 59.94/29.97/23.98p/50/25p and 100Mbps unlimited
  • Slow & Quick motion: Slow: 4K up to 60p in MP4, FHD up to 120p at full width or 180p with narrower angle of view, Quick: 4K to 1p
  • Sensitivity: Dual native ISO 100, 6400, Range: ISO100-51,200, expandable to ISO 50-204,800. Dual-native ISO for video
  • Shutter speed: 60-1/16,000sec, Bulb to 30mins
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: AF-S or manual focus: 7fps, AF-C: 5fps, 6K Photo 30fps, 4K Photo: 60fps
  • Memory: Dual SD card slots, 1 UHS-II, 1 UHS-I
  • Weight: 714g with memory card and battery
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 132.6x97.1x81.9mm

No modern camera is complete without in-body image stabilisation, so naturally, the Panasonic S5 has IBIS. By itself, this is claimed to offer up to 5 stops of shutter speed compensation across 5 axes, but it can also work with lens-based IS to extend the compensation to up to 6.5EV.

What’s more, Panasonic has been generous with the Lumix S5 and given it a lengthy roster of features. In addition to its stabilisation and impressive video credentials, there are also some great stills features including a 96Mp High Resolution mode for raw and Jpeg images, and Live View Composite mode to help with long exposure images.

Impressively, the engineers at Panasonic have also managed to make the Panasonic S5 smaller than the Lumix GH5. That’s quite a feat given the difference in the sensor and mount sizes of the two cameras.

Price when reviewed
£1799
$1998
Check current price

For

  • Smaller than the MFT Lumix GH5
  • Viewfinder and vari-angle touchscreen
  • V-log pre-installed

Against

  • Contrast-detection AF doesn't match the phase-detection competition
  • On-screen icons are quite small

Panasonic S1

Panasonic Lumix S1 Review

Specification

  • Sensor: 24.2MP full-frame (23.8×35.6mm)
  • Video: 4K (3840×2160) at 60fps and 150Mbps
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis in-body stabilisation
  • High Resolution Mode: 96MP (12,000 x 8,000-pixel) images

The Lumix S1 is aimed at professional and high-end enthusiast photographers and videographers. It’s a complex camera that offers lots of opportunities to customise it and make it work for you. It also has a dual-tilting screen, a first-rate viewfinder, excellent video specification, a fast AF system and a useful High Resolution mode that can produce 96Mp images.

Like the Panasonic G9 and S1R, the Lumix S1 has a High Resolution mode. When this is selected, the camera takes a sequence of shots in quick succession with the sensor moving by a tiny amount between each. The S1 then merges the images into a single raw file.

When the aspect ratio is set to 3:2, using High Resolution Mode results in 12,000 x 8,000-pixel images. That’s 96Mp. Thanks to the S1’s IBIS (in-body image stabilisation), its sensor can be moved by a tiny amount between shots in the High Resolution mode. This enables the camera to gather more information about the scene and create larger images.

When the image resolution is set to 300ppi, a standard 24Mp image produces prints that measure 20×13.3inches or 50.8×33.87cm. However, a 96Mp High Resolution mode image would make prints that measure 40×26.6 or 106.6×67.7cm. Each dimension is twice that of the standard image. That’s attractive to landscape, still life, macro and commercial photographers.

There are a few restrictions applied when you use High Resolution mode. For example, it automatically uses the electronic shutter, the minimum aperture is f/16 and the shutter speed can only be set from between 1 and 1/8000 of a second. Sensitivity can be set up to ISO 3200.

It’s the type of camera that takes some getting to know, but it’s also a camera that is worth getting to know.

As the lower-resolution of Panasonic’s two full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Panasonic S1 has a 24.2Mp full-frame sensor. Interestingly, this is a 23.8×35.6mm device whereas the S1R’s sensor is listed as 24x36mm. The total pixel count is 25.28Mp while the effective pixel count is 24.2million.

That sensor has a native aspect ratio of 3:2, but it’s also possible to shoot in 4:3, 1:1, 16: 9, 2:1 and 65:24.

The image sensor is paired with a new Venus Engine processor. This enables a maximum shooting rate of 6fps with continuous autofocusing. If you can do without C-AF, however, the rate can be pushed to 9fps. Alternatively, in 4K/6K Photo mode, it’s possible to shoot 4K images at 60fps or 6K images at 30fps.

Panasonic is aiming the Lumix S1 at creatives who want to be able to shoot both stills and video. On the video front, the headline feature is that the S1 can shoot 4K (3840×2160) at 60fps and 150Mbps. However, if you want to keep the full width of the sensor, the maximum frame rate for 4K video is 30fps.

There’s also an HEVC shooting option at 4:2:0 10-bit for internal recording. This option is missing from the Lumix S1R.

Helpfully, Panasonic’s Dual IS system is incorporated. This stabilises images and video.

In addition, Panasonic is going to introduce an optional (paid for) firmware update for the Lumix S1 to introduce full V-Log recording. This will also enable 4:2:2 10-bit 4K 24p/30p internal video recording and 4:2:2 10-bit 4K 60p HDMI output.

Price when reviewed
£2200
$2497.99
Check current price

For

  • Solid construction
  • 4K footage is very impressive
  • AF system great at picking out small subjects

Against

  • No Vari-angle screen
  • AF tracking sometimes erratic, but good for most subjects
  • Menu is sometimes confusing

Panasonic G9

Panasonic G9 Review

Specification

  • Burst Mode (electronic shutter): 20fps with C-AF
  • Burst Mode (electronic shutter): 60fps with S-AF
  • Burst Mode (mechanical shutter): 9fps with C-AF
  • Burst Mode (mechanical shutter): 12fps with S-AF

The G9 boasts Dual IS, a system that can combine 5-axis sensor shifting-stabilisation and lens-based stabilisation. The lens based-stabilisation aspect is particularly important with long lenses.

In the G9, Panasonic’s impressive Dual IS delivers a correction of 6.5EV at all focal lengths, which puts it on a par with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II. It also functions in both stills and video mode.

One aspect that impressed us straight away with the G9 was its autofocus system. When we directed it towards a low-light area with low contrast, it latched on to the subject very quickly, with no noticeable hesitation or indecision.

This proved very useful when photographing wildlife by torchlight or when it was heavily camouflaged by a dense thicket.

Price when reviewed
£1499
Check current price

For

  • As fast as the Sony A9
  • Excellent buffer
  • Superb EVF and screen
  • Stabilisation system rated at 6.5EV
  • Weather-sealed

Against

  • Four Thirds sensor
  • 400-frame battery life
  • Oddly positioned joystick

Panasonic Lumix GX9

Bargain Cameras: Panasonic Lumix GX9

Specification

  • Sensor: 20.3-megapixel Micro Four Thirds
  • Stabilisation: Sensor-Shift, 5-Axis
  • Sensitivity: 200 to 25600 (Extended: 100 to 25600)
  • Video: UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 24.00p/29.97p [100 Mb/s]
  • Viewfinder: 2,760,000-dot EVF
  • Monitor: 3-inch 1,240,000-dot tilting touchscreen

Panasonic introduced the GX9 to sit in the middle of its range as a “premium street photography camera”. With its small body size and flat rangefinder type design, it’s also ideally suited as a travel camera – especially if you already own another Micro Four Thirds camera.

It houses a 20.3 megapixel Four Thirds sensor, without an anti-aliasing filter for increased detail resolution.

It has a host of other appealing specifications, including a high-resolution tilting viewfinder, a tilting touch-sensitive LCD screen, 4K Photo and Video modes, and compatibility with the huge range of Micro Four Thirds lenses.

The look of the camera is also very stylish, without attracting too much attention when using it out and about, which is ideal. There’s a good mixture of buttons and dials on the camera, while the tilting screen is very handy for composing from awkward angles – I’m personally not too bothered about articulation for a camera like this (others may feel differently).

Overall image quality is very good, particularly in good or bright light. In lower light, watch out for a little loss of detail in places, and try to stick to as wide an aperture as possible. Colours are nicely reproduced, being natural while also vibrant, while focusing is generally quick and accurate.

Price when reviewed
£599
$997
Check current price

For

  • Small and lightweight
  • Nice colours
  • Tilting screen is great for shooting at odd angles

Against

  • Some loss of detail in low light

Which Fujifilm cameras have IBIS?

Fujifilm recently introduced in-body image stabilisation to both its APS-C X series cameras and to its medium format GFX line.

Fujifilm X-H2S

Fujifilm X-H2S review

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 31st May 2022
  • Sensor: 26.16Mp APS-C (23.5 x 15.6mm) X-Trans CMOS 5 HS
  • In body image stabilisation: 5-axis giving up to 7EV shutter speed compensation
  • Processing engine: X-Processor 5
  • Lens mount: Fujifilm X
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 160-12,800 expandable to ISO 80-51,200
  • Autofocus system: Intelligent Hybrid with up to 425 points
  • Max continuous shooting rate: Electronic shutter: 40fps for 184 jpegs, 170 lossless compressed raw or 140 uncompressed raw, Mechanical shutter: 15fps for 1000+ jpegs, lossless compressed raw or 1000 uncompressed raw
  • Max video resolution: 6.2K (6240x4160) 29.97/25/24/23.98p, DCI 4K (4096x2160) 59.94/50/29.97/25/24/23.98p or 120/100p in High Speed mode, 4K (3840x2160) 59.94/50/29.97/25/24/23.98p or 120/100p in High Speed mode
  • Viewfinder: 0.5 inch 5.76 million-dot OLED Color Viewfinder with 100% coverage Eyepoint: approx. 24mm Diopter adjustment: -5~+3m-1 Magnification: 0.8× with 50mm lens
  • Screen: Vari-angle 3-inch LCD with 1.62-million dots
  • Dimensions: 136.3 x 92.9 x 84.6mm
  • Weight: 579g (body only), 660g with battery and card

Inside the Fujifilm X-H2S is the 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 5 HS, the 5th generation of Fujifilm’s X-Trans CMOS sensor. It’s the first of these sensors to feature a stacked design and the change means that information can be read off the chip much more quickly than from previous X-Trans CMOS sensors or standard backside-illuminated (BSI) sensors. In fact, according to Fujifilm, the new sensor is 4x faster than its predecessor.

This sensor is paired with the 5th generation X Processor (X-Processor 5), which has twice the speed of the previous engine. Together the sensor and X-Processor 5 enable some impressive headline figures including a maximum continuous shooting rate of 40 frames per second (fps) at full-resolution with full autofocus (AF) capability, 6.2K video at 30p, 4K video at 120p, 120fps Live View and enhanced rolling shutter control with the full sensor being cleared in 1/151sec for stills and 1/180 sec when shooting video.

Thanks to the new processor and sensing control function, Fujifilm has updated the five-axis in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) mechanism from its predecessor, the X-H1 (also on our list of which cameras have IBIS). It’s said to deliver up to 7.0-stop shutter speed compensation to the new processor and a new sensing control function.

Price when reviewed
£2499
$2499

For

  • 40fps continuous shooting with AF
  • Subject detection at 40fps and during video
  • 6.2K video

Against

  • Change in control layout in comparison with the X-H1
  • Focus mode switch replaced with a button
  • No dedicated exposure compensation dial

Fujifilm X-T4

Fujifilm X-T4

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 26th February 2020
  • Sensor: 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 APS-C sensor
  • Processing engine: X-Processor 4
  • Lens mount: X-Mount
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 160-12,800 expandable to ISO 80-51200
  • Viewfinder: 3.69-million-dot high resolution EVF (100% coverage)
  • Screen: Vari-angle 3-inch 1.6 million dot touch screen LCD
  • Autofocus system: Intelligent hybrid with up to 425 selectable AF points
  • Continuous shooting: Mechanical Shutter: 15fps, Electronic Shutter: 20fps continuous shooting at full resolution with AF
  • Max video resolution: C4K (4096×2160) at 59.94p/50p/29.97p/25p/24p/23.98p 400Mbps/200Mbps/100Mbps, 4:2:0 10bit internal SD card recording; 1080/240p
  • Storage: 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 134.6x92.8x63.8mm (37.9mm at the thinnest point)
  • Weight: 607g including battery and card, 526g body only

In many respects the Fuji X-T4 is the same as the X-T3. However, the new camera makes some significant upgrades. For many photographers the most significant of these is the addition of in-body image stabilisation (IBIS).

Image stabilisation was a notable omission from the X-T3 specification sheet. This came as a surprise to some who expected it to be present after Fujifilm included it in the X-H1. However, the X-H1 is significantly larger than the X-T3 and that is in part because of the size of the IBIS unit.

Two years down the line after the introduction of the X-H1, Fujifilm has managed to shrink the IBIS unit by 30%. It’s also 20% lighter. This was achieved by using magnets instead of springs in the system and it means that it’s now small enough to fit within an X-T Series camera shell.

The X-T4’s IBIS works over 5 axis and has a claimed shutter speed compensation value of 6.5Ev with 18 of Fuji’s XF and XC lenses. It works in tandem with the IS system in stabilised lenses, using the lens-based system first and making up any shortfall with the in-body system.

According to Fujifilm UK, it’s better than the X-H1’s IBIS. And helpfully, it functions with third party lenses over 3 axis.

The Fujifilm X-T4’s IBIS also operates in video mode, along with a new Digital Image Stabilisation (DIS) system and IS Mode Boost.

Price when reviewed
£1549
$1699
Check current price

For

  • In-body image stabilisation
  • Vari-angle touchscreen
  • Excellent viewfinder

Against

  • Complex array of continuous shooting options
  • Some may miss the metering mode switch/dial of the X-T3

Fujifilm X-S10

Fujifilm X-S10

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 15th October 2020
  • Sensor: 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 APS-C sensor
  • Processing engine: X-Processor 4
  • Lens mount: X-Mount
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 160-12,800 expandable to ISO 80-51200
  • Viewfinder: 2.36-million-dot EVF (100% coverage) with 0.62x magnification
  • Screen: Vari-angle 3-inch 1.04million-dot touchscreen LCD
  • Autofocus system: Intelligent hybrid with up to 425 selectable AF points
  • Continuous shooting: Mechanical Shutter: 8fps, Electronic Shutter: 20fps continuous shooting at full resolution with AF
  • Max video resolution: DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at 29.97/25/24/23.98fps, 4K/30p 4:2:0 8-bit, 4K/30p 4:2:2 10-bit video via the HDMI, Full-HD at up to 240p
  • Storage: SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 126.0x85.1x65.4mm
  • Weight: 465g including battery and card

It may sit below the X-T4 in Fujifilm’s line up but the X-S10 has in-body image stabilisation (IBIS). Impressively, Fuji’s engineers have managed to make the IBIS unit 30% smaller than the one in the X-T4 but it still enables up to 6EV of shutter speed compensation. That puts it ahead of the Fujifilm X-H1 which gives a maximum compensation of 5EV but 0.5EV behind the X-T4 which can manage 6.5EV compensation with some lenses.

Fujifilm claims that the X-S10 is capable of compensating for shutter speeds that are up to 6EV slower than you can normally use hand-held. The degree of compensation varies depending upon the lens that you use and also from person to person.

Shooting with the XF18-55mmF2.8-4 R LM OIS kit lens (which has a stabilisation system built-in) at the 55mm end, Angela was able to get around 50% of her images perfectly sharp at a shutter speed of 1/2-second. That’s a compensation factor of over 5EV.

The stabilisation also functions during video shooting, helping to take out some of the fine-tremor that you see when hand-holding a camera.

Price when reviewed
£949
$999
Check current price

For

  • In-body image stabilisation
  • Vari-angle touchscreen
  • Excellent sensor and processor combination

Against

  • Not weather-sealed
  • Complex collection of continuous shooting options

Fujifilm GFX 50S II

Fujifilm GFX50S II

Specification

  • Camera type: Medium format mirrorless
  • Announced: 2nd September 2021
  • Sensor: 51.4Mp Medium format (43.8 x 32.9mm) CMOS with Bayer colour filter array
  • Maximum image size: 8256 x 6192
  • Processor: X Processor 4
  • Lens mount: Fujifilm G
  • Autofocusing: Contrast detection with Contrast Rapid AF and up to 425 user-selectable points
  • Viewfinder: Fixed 0.5-inch 3.69million-dot EVF with 0.77x magnifications 50fps
  • Screen: 3-direction tilting 3.2-inch 2.36million-dot touchscreen
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: 3fps
  • Sensitivity range: Standard ISO 100-12,800, expandable to ISO 50-102,400
  • Image stabilisation: In-body 5-axis giving 6.5EV compensation
  • Max video resolution: Full-HD (1920 x 1080) 4:2:0 8-bit
  • Film Simulation Modes: 19 modes: Provia/Standard, Velvia/Vivid, Astia/Soft, Classic Chrome, Pro Neg.Hi, Pro Neg.Std Classic Neg., Nostalgic Neg., Eterna/Cinema, Eterna Beach Bypass, Acros, Acros + Ye Filter, Acros + R Filter, Acros + G Filter, Black & White, Black & White + Ye Filter, Black & White + R Filter, Black & White + G Filter, Sepia
  • Storage: Dual SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Battery: NP-W325, life of455 images
  • Dimensions: 150 x 104 x 44mm
  • Weight: 900g

While the Fujifilm GFX50S has the same 51.4Mp (43.8 x 32.9mm) sensor as the GFX50S, it’s paired with a more modern processing engine, the X Processor 4. This enables improved low light performance, boosted dynamic range, in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) that gives up to 6.5EV of shutter speed compensation and high-resolution Pixel Shift Multi Shot mode.

In Pixel Shift Multi Shot mode the camera shoots 16 images in short succession with the sensor moving by a tiny amount between each capture. The images can then be composited on a computer running Fujifilm’s Pixel Shift Combiner software to create a 205Mp image. The interval between each of the 16 shots can be set to the ‘shortest possible’ or 1, 2, 5 or 15 seconds.

Sure, a camera that costs more £3,000 has niche appeal, but Fujifilm has pared back some of the features to make a less complicated and more affordable camera that will make it attractive to a larger audience. Suddenly, digital medium format photography is looking like a viable alternative to full-frame-shooting for more of us.

Price when reviewed
£3499
$3999 / €3999 / £3899 / $4499 / €4499
Check current price

For

  • 43.8 x 32.9mm sensor
  • Compact for medium format
  • Weatherproof

Against

  • Contrast detection AF
  • Laggy (but high-resolution) viewfinder

Fujifilm X-H1

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: 24.3Mp APS-C (23.6 x 15.6mm) X-Trans CMOS
  • Processing engine: X Processor Pro
  • Lens mount: Fujifilm X
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 200-12,800 expandable to ISO 100-51,200
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 91 or 325 points
  • Max continuous shooting rate: Electronic shutter: 14fps for 42 jpegs, 28 lossless compressed raw or 25 uncompressed raw, Mechanical shutter: 8fps for 83 jpegs, 33 lossless compressed raw or 27 uncompressed raw or 11fps with VPB for 73 jpegs, 30 lossless compressed raw or 27 uncompressed raw
  • Max video resolution: 4K (4096×2160)] 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 15min. 4K (3840×2160)] 29.97P / 25P / 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 15min. Full HD (1920×1080)] 59.94P / 50P / 29.97P / 25P / 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 20min. HD (1280×720)] 59.94P / 50P / 29.97P / 25P / 24P / 23.98P up to approx. 30min. With Vertical Power Booster Grip attached, individual movie recording time is extended up to approx. 30min. on both 4K and Full HD mode.
  • Viewfinder: 0.5 inch 3.69 million-dot OLED Color Viewfinder with approx 100% coverage Eyepoint: approx. 23mm Diopter adjustment: -4~+2m-1 Magnification: 0.75× with 50mm lens
  • Screen: Dual-tilting 3-inch LCD with 1,040,000 dots
  • Dimensions: 139.8 x 97.3 x 85.5mm
  • Weight: 623g (body only), 673g with battery and card

One of the most widely anticipated introductions made by the X-H1 is the 5-axis in-body image stabilisation system (IBIS). This is a first for the Fuji X-Series and it uses three axial accelerometers, three axial Gyro sensors, and a dual-processor arrangement to enable the hand-held shutter speed to be extended by a claimed maximum of 5.5 stops with the XF 35mm f/1.4 R mounted.

This was the first time we’ve seen in-body image stabilisation in a Fuji X-Series camera and it performs very well.

The X-H1 is a little harder to find these days, but if you can, you can often get it for a bargain. It still offers superb image quality and wonderful stabilisation.

Price when reviewed
£1699
Check current price

For

  • C4K video with F-Log and 200Mbps
  • 5-axis image stabilisation built-in
  • Superb viewfinder

Against

  • Autofocusing not as good as some of the competition in low-light
  • No dedicated exposure compensation dial
  • EVF eye-cup can block the view of the top of the main screen

Fujifilm GFX100S

Fujifilm GFX 100S

Specification

  • Camera type: Medium format mirrorless
  • Announced: 27th January 2021
  • Sensor: 102Mp Medium format (43.8 x 32.9mm) CMOS with Bayer colour filter array
  • Maximum image size: 11648 x 8736
  • Processor: X Processor 4
  • Lens mount: Fujifilm G
  • Autofocusing: Intelligent Hybrid with up to 425 AF points
  • Autofocus system: Intelligent Hybrid AF (contrast AF / phase-detection AF) with up to 425 selectable AF points
  • Viewfinder: Fixed 0.5-inch 3.69million-dot EVF with 0.77x magnifications 85fps
  • Screen: 3-direction tilting 3.2-inch 2.36million-dot touchscreen
  • Continuous Shooting: 5fps for 42Jpegs, 16 compressed raw, 15 lossless compressed raw or 14 uncompressed raw
  • Sensitivity range: Standard ISO 100-12,800, expandable to ISO 50-102,400
  • Image stabilisation: In-body 5-axis giving 6EV compensation, Plus Digital IS and IS Boost for video
  • Max video resolution: 4K (4096×2160) 29.97p 400Mbps up to 120min recording, Digital IS (1.1x crop), F-Log, HLG, ProRes Raw (12-bit HDMI)
  • Film Simulation Modes: 19 modes: Provia/Standard, Velvia/Vivid, Astia/Soft, Classic Chrome, Pro Neg.Hi, Pro Neg.Std Classic Neg., Nostalgic Neg., Eterna/Cinema, Eterna Beach Bypass, Acros, Acros + Ye Filter, Acros + R Filter, Acros + G Filter, Black & White, Black & White + Ye Filter, Black & White + R Filter, Black & White + G Filter, Sepia
  • Storage: SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Battery: NP-W325 460 images
  • Dimensions: 150 x 104 x 44mm
  • Weight: 900g including battery and card

Like the GFX 100, the Fuji GFX 100S has IBIS (in-body image stabilisation). This operates across 5 axes and is claimed to give up to 6EV shutter speed compensation.

Following a firmware upgrade, the GFX 100 can use its IBIS to shift the sensor between each in a sequence of 16 images to create a 400Mp image. This same functionality, Pixel Shift Multi Shot mode, is available on the new Fuji GFX 100S from the outset.

Unsurprisingly, the images are composited on a computer running Fujifilm’s Pixel Shift Combiner software rather than in-camera. Follow the link to read how to use Fujifilm’s Pixel Shift Multi Shot mode.

With the Fujifilm GFX100, Angela got a hit rate of around 40% when shooting handheld with the mechanical shutter and a shutter speed of 1/8sec with the GF 63mm f/2.8 R WR lens mounted. This rose to nearly 100% at 1/15sec. That’s an impressive degree of stabilisation for a medium format camera, which many people would consider has to be used on a tripod.

Fujifilm has decreased the size of the IBIS (in-body image stabilisation) unit in the GFX100S and it’s claimed to give up to 6EV shutter speed compensation. With the Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR mounted, I was able to get consistently sharp results at the 64mm end (equivalent to around 51mm on a full-frame camera) at shutter speeds of /6 and 1/7sec, but using the Fujinon GF 120mm F4 R LM OIS WR Macro (equivalent to 95mm) at 1/9sec was a step too far.

Price when reviewed
£5499
$5999 / €5999
Check current price

For

  • Superb sensor
  • Phase detection autofocus system
  • Small for medium format

Against

  • Doesn't have all the traditional exposure controls of the GFX 50S
  • The eye AF isn't very assured

Fujifilm GFX 100

Specification

  • Camera type: Medium format mirrorless
  • Announced: June 2019
  • Phase detection AF points: 3.67m
  • Sensor: 102Mp Medium format (43.8 x 32.9mm) CMOS with Bayer colour filter array
  • Lens mount: Fujifilm G
  • Autofocus system: Intelligent Hybrid AF (contrast AF / phase-detection AF) with up to 425 selectable AF points
  • Viewfinder: 0.5-inch 5.76million-dot OLED
  • Screen: 3-direction tilting 3.2-inch 2.36million-dot touchscreen
  • Continuous Shooting: 10fps for up to 58 Jpeg and 25 raw files with UHS-II card with the viewfinder. In Live view mode, up to 11fps with One-Shot AF or 7fps with Servo AF
  • Sensitivity range: Stills: ISO 100-12,800 expandable to ISO 50-102,400, Video: ISO 200-12,800 expandable to 50-25,600
  • Max video resolution: 4K (4096×2160) 29.97p / 25p / 24p / 23.98p 400Mbps/200Mbps/100Mbps up to Approx. 60min.
  • Storage: SD/SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions: 156.2mm x 163.6mm x102.9mm (inc EVF)
  • Weight: 1,400g including EVF, 2x battery & memory card

The Fujifilm GFX 100 is a medium format mirrorless camera with the Fujifilm G mount. It’s also the first medium format digital camera to have in-body image stabilisation (IBIS).

However, including a 5-axis stabilisation system means that it’s also bigger than the Fuji GFX 50S and GFX 50R. It also prompted Fuji to add a vertical grip. This means that the Fuji GFX 100 is the first medium format mirrorless digital camera to feature an integrated double grip design.

The Fujifilm GFX 100 uses a three-axis accelerometer, three-axis gyro sensor and a dedicated dual processor to power its in-body image stabilisation (IBIS). This gives stabilisation across 5-axis with up to 5.5EV of shutter speed compensation when hand-holding the camera.

In her review, Angela was able to achieve a hit rate of approximately 40% at a shutter speed of 1/8sec and nearly 100% at 1/15sec when I used the GFX 100 with its mechanical shutter and the GF 63mm f/2.8 R WR lens.

Price when reviewed
£9999
$9999.95
Check current price

For

  • Stunning images
  • Excellent autofocus system
  • Superb stabilisation system

Against

  • The vertical grip could be better-shaped and offer more purchase
  • Doesn't have all the traditional exposure controls of cameras like the Fujifilm X-T3
  • High price

Which Pentax cameras have IBIS?

Pentax’s K-1 Mark II may be big and bulky, but the full-frame DSLR offers superb stabilisation. Rumours of a new flagship APS-C DSLR could add another camera to this list.

Pentax K-1 II

Specification

  • Sensor: 36.4 million Full-frame (35.9 x 24mm)
  • Processor: PRIME IV
  • Autofocus: 33-points with 25 cross-type
  • Sensitivity: ISO 100-240,800

There aren’t a whole lot of differences between the Pentax K-1 II and the K-1, but chief among them was an upgrade to Pentax’s Pixel Shift Resolution System. This is now called Pixel Shift Resolution System II and includes a Dynamic Pixel Shift Resolution mode, which is designed to record better colour and definition.

It works by moving the sensor by a pixel width between each of four shots which are then composited into one image. For the first time there are two modes for this.

The first being the one we have seen before that should only be used when the camera is on a tripod and with a motionless subject. A second new option is able to cope with moving subjects and the camera being hand-held. Pentax still recommends using a tripod for the best results though.

Pentax says Pixel Shift Resolution II obtains RGB colour data for each pixel to produce super-high-resolution images with finer details and more truthful colours than those produced by ordinary full-frame sensors.

In the new Dynamic Pixel Shift Resolution mode, which can be used during handheld shooting, this system can be used jointly with the camera’s shake-reduction mechanism, since it synthesizes the captured super-high-resolution images by detecting the slight fluctuations of the subject’s position during continuous shooting.

The camera also provides ON/OFF switching of the Motion Correction function, which detects moving elements of the continuously captured images to minimize the effect of movement during the image synthesizing process.

Price when reviewed
£1800
$1999.95
Check current price

For

  • Captures superb detail
  • Pixel Shift Resolution II
  • Excellent colour
  • Weather-proof

Against

  • Poor menu system
  • Focusing in live view a little slow

Which Olympus cameras have IBIS?

An early pioneer in in-body image stabilisation, it was Olympus cameras like the E-M1 Mark II that showed us the extremes to which you can push your camera and truly shoot anywhere.

OM System OM-1

OM System OM-1 review

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Announced: 15th February 2022
  • Sensor: 20.4Mp Four Thirds Type (17.3 x 13.0mm) CMOS
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 80-102,400
  • In body stabilisation: 5-axis giving up to 7EV shutter speed compensation, 8EV when combined with lens IS
  • Processing engine: TruePic X
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 1053 cross-type phase detection points and 1053 contrast detection points
  • Max continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter: 10fps
  • Pro Capture High Mode: 120fps (with Pro lenses) or 50fps AF tracking
  • Max video resolution: 4K (4096 x 2160) at 30, 25, 24p(approx. 102Mbps), 60, 50p (approx. 202Mbps), 4K (3840 x 2160) 30p, 25p, 24p (approx. 77Mbps), 60, 50p (approx. 152Mbps) all in LongGOP, Full HD (1920 x 1080) 30, 25, 24p / ALL-I(approx. 82Mbps), LongGOP(approx. 22Mbps) 60, 50p ALL-I(approx. 162Mbps, LongGOP(approx. 42Mbps)
  • Video format: MOV (MPEG-4AVC/H.264)
  • Viewfinder: 5.76M-dot OLED
  • Screen: 3-inch 1,.62M-dot vari-angle touchscreen
  • Storage: 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II)
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 134.8 x 91.6 x 72.7mm
  • Weight: 511g (body only), 599g including battery, 1 memory card but excluding the eye cup

Naturally, the OM System OM-1 benefits from a range of features and technologies developed by Olympus. Live Composite mode, for example, is perfect for capturing images of traffic trails, fireworks and light painting as it enables a sequence of images to be captured with the ambient exposure being set by the first image and from then on only the new brighter areas are recorded.

This feature is also compatible with the the camera’s image stabilisation system, which is regarded as one of the best available, to enable handheld long exposure photography. The OM-1’s 5-axis IBIS provides up to 7EV shutter speed compensation, or 8EV when combined with lens IS.

Olympus’s image stabilisation system has a strong reputation and it delivers in the OM System OM1. With the Olympus M.Zuiko ED 12-45mm Pro mounted and used at the 12mm (24mm equivalent in 35mm terms), we were able to get sharp images with 1 second or longer exposures when hand-holding the camera. The stabilisation also works well in video mode.

Price when reviewed
£2000
$2199.99
Check current price

For

  • High weatherproofing
  • High-speed shooting capability
  • Excellent subject detection modes

Against

  • Four Thirds sensor is smaller than APS-C and full-frame
  • Some may wish for higher resolution
  • Menus not touch-sensitive

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
  • Sensor: Four Thirds type 20.4 MP Live MOS sensor
  • Announced: 12th February 2020
  • Processing engine: TruePic IX
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 121-point all cross-type focus points
  • Max continuous shooting rate: 18fps AF/AE mechanical shutter (C-AF), 60fps in electronic shutter (S-AF)
  • Max video resolution: C4K (4096 x 2160) at 30/25p
  • Viewfinder: 2,360,000-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 64-25,600
  • Screen: Vari‑angle 3-inch 1,037,000-dot touchscreen
  • Storage: 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC (1 UHS-I and 1 UHS-II)
  • Dimensions (LxHxW): 134.1 x 90.9 x 68.9mm
  • Weight: 504g body only, 580g with battery and SD card

Olympus’s image stabilisation (IS) is excellent and it was upgraded for the E-M1 Mark III to enable up to 7.5Ev of shutter speed compensation across 5 axis with a stabilised lens.

Even without a stabilised lens it’s said to enable up to 7Ev compensation. This has been achieved by using the same gyro as is in the E-M1X.

It’s the sensor-shifting power of the in-body image stabilisation system (IBIS) that enables the OM-D E-M1 III’s High Res Shot mode. The good news here is that in addition to the 80Mp Tripod High Res Shot mode, there’s also a 50Mp HandHeld version.

An option in the menu allows you to select Handheld or Tripod mode. Then all you need to do is set the camera to High Res Shot via the drive settings. One press of the shutter release triggers the camera to shoot a series of images each with the sensor in a slightly different location.

The images are then composited in-camera to create one larger picture (raw and/or Jpeg) with more detail.

Price when reviewed
£1600
$1499
Check current price

For

  • Compact size with vari-angle screen
  • Great feature set
  • Excellent lens range

Against

  • Sub-APS-C size sensor
  • Uses the same sensor as its predecessor
  • Lacks the subject recognition system of the E-M1X

Olympus OM-D E-M1X

Olympus OM-D E-M1X review

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless
  • Sensor: 20.4Mp Four Thirds Type (17.3 x 13.0mm) CMOS
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 64-25,600
  • Processing engine: 2x TruePic VIII
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 121 cross-type points (800 in magnified view)
  • Max continuous shooting rate: 18fps with AF tracking, 60fps with AF locked on first frame with electronic shutter
  • Pro Capture High Mode: 60fps
  • Pro Capture Low Mode: 18fps
  • Burst Mode in S-AF: 15fps for 143 raw files
  • Burst Mode in C-AF: 10fps for 283 raw files
  • Max video resolution: 4K (4096 x 2160) at 24p
  • Viewfinder: Electronic with 2,360,000 dots
  • Screen: Touch-sensitive vari-angle 3-inch LCD with 1,037,000 dots
  • Storage: 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II)
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 144.4 x 146.8 x 75.4mm
  • Weight: 849g (body only), 997g (including 2 batteries and memory cards)

Need we keep saying it? Olympus’s 5-axis Image Stabiliser is the best around. It’s enabled us to use exposures of 2 or 3 seconds when hand-holding older models like the OM-D E-M1 II with a wide-angle lens.

However, the OM-D E-M1X introduced a new gyro sensor and this improved the IS performance. Olympus claims it gives 7.5EV shutter speed compensation with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4.0 IS PRO at a focal length of 100mm (35mm equivalent: 200mm).

Helpfully, the IS also works in video mode and you can also adjust the level of stabilisation that’s applied.

Price when reviewed
£2199
$1999
Check current price

For

  • One of the fastest cameras you can buy
  • Pro Capture Mode offers lots of flexibility
  • High Res Shot mode is very impressive

Against

  • It's very big and heavy for a Micro Four Thirds camera
  • Four Thirds sensor
  • Need more smaller, lighter, more affordable long telephoto lenses

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III Review

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless camera
  • Sensor: 20.4Mp Live MOS Micro Four Thirds sensor
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
  • Processing engine: TruePic VIII
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 64-25,600
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 121 (all cross-type) phase-detection AF points
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: Mechanical shutter: 10fps with focus and exposure fixed at the start of the burst, 6fps with C-AF, Electronic Shutter 30fps and 10fps
  • Max video resolution: C4K 24p at up to 237Mbps / 4K 30p, 25p, 24p at 102Mbps
  • Live Bulb Shooting Options: Live Composite, Live Time, Live Bulb, Focus Bracketing, Focus Stacking, 50Mp High Res Shot modes
  • Viewfinder: 2,360,000-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Screen: Vari‑angle 3.0-inch 1,037,000-dot touchscreen
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 125.3 x 85.2 x 9.7mm
  • Weight: 414g including battery and memory card, 366g body only

Technically the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III sits below the OM-D E-M1 Mark II in Olympus’s interchangeable lens camera line-up but it has an updated processor that gives its smaller body a slight edge for speed and AF performance.

It also produces nice images and the stabilisation system is incredible, enabling you to hand-hold the camera and get sharp images with exposures measured in whole seconds.

Incredibly, the OM-D E-M5 Mark III can deliver up to 5.5Ev with a non-stabilised lens and 6.5EV with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4.0 IS PRO at 100mm (200mm equivalent).

Olympus’s stabilisation system is the best around and it really delivers in the OM-D E-M5 Mark III. I shot a video while walking up and downstairs and the results are great. It almost makes a motorised gimbal pointless.

Meanwhile, in stills mode it can enable sharp images to be shot hand-held at shutter speeds measured in whole seconds. With the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 lens at the wider end, for example, I have perfectly sharp shots captured with exposure times longer than 3 seconds. With an elbow rest and careful breathing, I was even able to get sharp images with 8-second exposures.

Price when reviewed
£1100
$1199.99
Check current price

For

  • Images full of detail
  • Low noise at higher ISOs
  • Superb stabilisation

Against

  • Image quality can't quite match full-frame
  • Dynamic range could be better

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV review

Specification

  • Camera type: Micro Four Thirds mirrorless
  • Announced: 4th August 2020
  • Sensor: Four Thirds Type 20.3Mp Live MOS
  • Processing engines: TruePic VIII
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 80-25,600
  • Viewfinder: 2,360,000-dot electronic with 1.23x magnification and 19.2mm eye point
  • Stabilisation: 5-axis with up to 4.5EV shutter speed compensation
  • Screen: 3-inch 1,037,000-dot tilting touchscreen
  • Focus modes: Manual focus, Single AF, Continuous AF, Single AF + MF, AF Tracking, Super Spot AF, Face Detection AF
  • Exposure modes: Programme, Aperture priority, Shutter priority, Manual, Bulb, Time, i-Auto, Scene Modes, Art Filter, Movie, Live Time, Live Composite, Advanced Photo Modes (Live Composite, Live Bulb, Multiple Exposure, HDR Backlight, Silent, Panorama, Keystone Compensation, AE bracketing, AF bracketing)
  • Autofocus system: Contrast detection with up to 121 points
  • Autofocus point selection modes: All target, Group target (9-areas), Single target
  • Exposure metering: 324 zones Multi-pattern Sensing System with ESP, Spot, Centre weighted, Highlight and Shadow mode
  • Art filers: Pop Art, Soft Focus, Pale & Light Colour, Light Tone, Grainy Film, Pin Hole, Diorama, Cross Process, Gentle Sepia, Dramatic Tone, Key Line, Water colour, Vintage, Partial Colour, Bleach Bypass, Instant Film
  • Shutter speed: 1/16,000-60sec, Bulb to 30mins
  • Maximum continuous shooting rate: High: 15 fps Low: 6.3 fps, Max. number of frames: High 42 raw files or 49 (LF) JPGs, Low: 945 raw files or until the card is full with (LF) JPGs
  • Video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) / 30p, 25p, 24p / IPB (approx. 102 Mbps) Full HD (1920 x 1080) / 30p, 25p, 24p (MOV) Full HD (1920 x 1080) / 60p, 50p / IPB (F,N) / (MOV) HD (1280 x 720) / 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p (MOV)
  • Time lapse: 4k, 1080p, 720p
  • Flash: Built-in GN 7.2 (ISO200), hotshoe for external flash
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
  • Multiple exposure: 2 frames with or without autogain
  • Storage: SDHC/SDXC UHS-II
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 121.7x84.4x49mm
  • Weight: 383g including battery and SD card

Olympus has given the E-M10 IV in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) which enables images to be captured at up to 4.5EV slower shutter speeds than normal. This system also operates in video mode and it can be augmented with digital stabilisation but using it results in a slight crop in the frame.

Olympus’s image stabilisation system is traditionally excellent and when Angela, our reviews editor, was shooting with the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens mounted, which has an effective focal length of 120mm, she was able to get around 50% of her images sharp at shutter speeds as low as 1/13sec.

With the 14-42mm kit lens in action at the 42mm end (84mm effective), she got a hit rate of around 80% at a shutter speed of 1/10sec and 50% at 1/5sec. She was even able to get 2 or 3 images in every 10 or so completely sharp at 1sec. That’s without any form of support and hand holding the camera at waist-level. Using the viewfinder often makes the camera more stable because it’s braced against your face.

If you’re looking for a camera to carry everywhere that will get you great results and doesn’t need a tripod much of the time, the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV is a great choice.

Price when reviewed
£699
$649
Check current price

For

  • Very compact, yet versatile camera
  • Tilting screen can face forwards for selfies and vlogging
  • Live Composite and Live Bulb mode make long exposure photography easy

Against

  • Sub-APS-C format sensor
  • No weatherproofing

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

Specification

  • Camera type: Mirrorless camera
  • Sensor: Four Thirds-type 20.4Mp Live MOS
  • Processing engine: TruePic VIII
  • Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
  • Autofocus system: Hybrid with 121 all cross-type focusing points
  • Max continuous shooting rate: 18fps with AF tracking, 60fps with AF locked on first frame with electronic shutter
  • Max video resolution: 4K (4096 x 2160) at 24p
  • Viewfinder: 2,360,000-dot electronic viewfinder
  • Sensitivity range: ISO 64-25,600
  • Screen: Vari‑angle 3-inch 1,037,000-dot touchscreen
  • Storage: 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC (UHS-II)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 134.1 x 90.9 x 68.9mm
  • Weight: 498g (body only), 574g (including battery and memory card)

The E-M1 II is a complex and versatile camera. It takes a while to get to discover all its features and understand some of its quirks, but it’s a rewarding experience.

Its stabilisation system is incredible and allows you to rethink how you shoot, leaving the tripod behind and avoiding high ISO settings. Olympus has also packed in the clever technology that we have come to expect with Live Bulb, Live Time and Live Composite mode making long exposure photography easy and in-camera focusing stacking enabling greater depth of field than is normally possible. In addition, High Res Shot mode turns this 20Mp camera into a 50Mp device – and you can use it for normal landscape photography with no concern about a breeze blowing through the trees.

High Res Shot mode has impressed us in the past with its ability to produce larger files with greater detail by combining a sequence of images in-camera. According to Olympus the latest version of the system in the OM-D E-M1 II produces images with resolution equivalent to 50Mp shots. It can also compensate for the slight movement in landscape scenes – leaves and grass etc.

Olympus’s Image Stabiliser (IS) is widely respected, but the latest version in the E-M1 II raised a few eyebrows at the launch event because it’s capable of extending the safe hand-holdable shutter speed by up to 6.5 stops with stabilised lenses like the new Olympus 12-100mm f/4.0 IS Pro. That’s an incredible figure, higher than any other camera. It could produce some interesting creative opportunities that are only normally possible with a tripod.

Further good news is that the Olympus OM-D E-M 1 Mark II is capable of recording 4K footage at up to 30p. Combining this with the claimed IS performance could mean the OM-D E-M1 Mark II prove popular with run-and-gun shooters.

Add in a high-quality viewfinder and a vari-angle touch-screen that helps you shoot from more creative angles and you have a very attractive camera.

Price when reviewed
£1499
$1299
Check current price

For

  • Fast and accurate focusing with moving subjects
  • Superb stabilisation system
  • Innovative features

Against

  • High price
  • Comparatively small sensor limits scope to restrict depth of field
  • High Res Shot mode a tripod only mode
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11 Comments
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alex
alex
1 year ago

What a great post!

John
1 year ago

I believe the Lumix G9X also has IBIS

John
1 year ago

Correction: I believe the Panasonic GX9 also has IBIS.

John
1 year ago

Hmmm, I mention a “readily available” camera with IBIS that you did not include in your survey, the Panasonic GX9, and you respond by deleting my post . How very professional. I won’t be visiting your site again.

John
John
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeff Meyer

my apologies

Joseph Shimandle
Joseph Shimandle
11 months ago

Good info. Would like to see a list of the cameras within the intro text linked to their following review.

Allan Cobb
Allan Cobb
9 months ago

Great article, but I’m surprised to see the K-1 as the only Pentax camera mentioned on this list.

ALL Pentax DSLRs since 2009 (from at least the K-7 and newer) have and have had IBIS ranging from 3.5 to 5 stops capability. Current models (the K-1, K-3 III, KP, K-70) have it. It’s called “Shake Reduction, (SR),” and has been improved with each Pentax DSLR generation.

Incidentally, it’s also what makes their “Astrotracer” (since the K-5) possible by leveraging that technology to move the sensor while making long (up to 5 minutes) exposures of the night sky without a tracking mount as long as the camera has embedded GPS or a GPS attachment (the O-GPS1).

younes Goussyra
younes Goussyra
8 months ago
Reply to  Allan Cobb

yes you’re right

Denis RT
4 months ago

Ibis is a must nowadays.I am really satisfied with my Lumix G9. Olympus and Canon have also great ibis.