Reviews |Peak Design Everyday Tote V2

Peak Design Everyday Tote V2 Review

Peak Design Everyday Tote V2
Review

Price when reviewed

£139

$149.95
Check current price

Our Verdict

While I will still use a backpack if I need to carry more than a camera and a couple of lenses, Peak Design’s Everyday Tote has become my everyday bag. I like its looks, its tough exterior and the protection it gives my kit. It’s also well thought through and comfortable to carry, with a good level of organisation so I can find all my stuff when I need it.

For

  • Stylish and doesn't look like a camera bag
  • Weatherproof
  • Good organisation

Against

  • Expensive
  • Space is limited if you need more than a basic kit

What is the Peak Design Everyday Tote V2?

The Everyday Tote V2 is Peak Design’s interpretation of a classic tote bag but it’s made with photographers in mind. It builds on the original Everyday Tote and was introduced at the end of 2019 with a smaller profile, better carry straps and new zips and fabric.

Peak Design offers the Everyday Tote V2 in two colours, bone (cream) and black.

Specification

  • Internal Dimensions: 40cm x 31 x 15cm
  • External Dimensions: 42cm x 32cm x 17cm
  • Main materials: 400D double poly-coated DWR-impregnated nylon canvas shell, 100% recycled post-consumer material, 900D waterproof bottom liner. Accents in leather (Bone) or Hypalon (Black)
  • Capacity: Min: 15L max: 20L
  • Laptop sleeve: 22.9 x 2.5 x 33cm . 9 x 1 x 13inches, holds 13-inch Macbook Pro
  • Weight: Without dividers: 0.82kg / 1.81lb, with dividers: 1.02kg / 2.25lb
Peak Design Everyday Tote V2

Features

Peak Design makes the shell of the Everyday Tote from weatherproof 100% recycled 400D nylon canvas that is DWR impregnated and PU-coated. That means that your kit is well-protected from the elements.

In addition to the two tote-style shoulder straps, the Everyday Tote comes with a longer, adjustable,  padded shoulder strap that can be clipped onto the loops at either side of the bag. This is long enough to be worn across your body.

The main compartment of the Everyday Tote is accessed via the wide zip at the top of the bag. This can be zipped closed for maximum security, but for speedy access, it can be left unzipped with the concealed magnets along the edge snapping together and the opening folding down to keep out rain or snow.

Inside the main compartment there are two Peak Design Flexfold dividers that can be configured to accommodate your kit. You can expect to fit in a mirrorless camera with 3 or 4 lenses plus a few accessories, or even a full-frame DSLR such as the Canon 5D Mark IV with a 70-200mm f/2.8 plus another lens or a few accessories.

Peak Design Everyday Tote V2

There are a couple of slim pouches within the main section that can hold a memory card wallet or spare batteries and the like.

At the back of the main section, there are a couple of sleeves, one that will take a 13-inch laptop and the other for a tablet or notepad. That’s useful if you’re carrying your camera on your commute.

Underneath a flap with a magnetic seal at the front of the bag, you’ll find a zip-close pocket that runs most of the width of the bag and has stretchy pockets to hold small items like memory cards and batteries. There’s also a cord with an Anchor Link that’s ideal for keeping your keys safe.

Peak Design Everyday Tote V2

There’s another compartment with a magnetic flap at the back of the bag that is useful for things like a lens cloth. Lifting this compartment’s flap also reveals a luggage passthrough loop that’s useful when you’re travelling further afield.

Peak Design supplies a couple of short carry straps with hooks that can slip onto loops on the outside of the bag to carry extras like a tripod or a jacket. There’s a loop on each corner of the bottom of the bag and two on either side at the top that would normally be used for the shoulder strap.

Peak Design Everyday Tote V2

Performance

I like to use a backpack if I have a lot of gear to carry because it distributes the weight across my shoulders. If there’s a waist belt, my hips can ease the burden on my shoulders.

However, there are times when a backpack just doesn’t seem appropriate. If you’re photographing to a social event, for example, or perhaps you’re going out to dinner or for a drink and you want to take your camera ‘just in case’. The Peak Design Everyday Tote is perfect for those kind of occasions.

I find the two tote-style should straps very comfortable. They also do a pretty good job of straying on my shoulder. However, with heavier loads, or when I want a bit more security, I use the adjustable strap across my body, and again it’s comfortable, with decent padding.

I have used the Everyday Tote to carry the Sony A7R IV, with the Sigma 35mm f/1.2 DG DN (review coming soon), a lens that weighs over 1Kg, on a four mile walk and my shoulder and back felt fine afterwards. On another occasion, I carried a couple of full-frame cameras with lenses plus a couple of accessories a few essentials, and again, it was a comfortable load.

Peak Design Everyday Tote V2

The only issue I had when walking a significant distance with the bag is that with the long strap across my body, one of the shoulder straps taps against the bag with each step. It beats out the rhythm of your walk and can get a bit annoying. The solution is to tuck both shoulder straps between your body and the bag, but it doesn’t stay put for very long and would be nice if there was a loop or a magnet or something to keep the straps still.

As you can see, I have the Peak Design Everyday Tote in  a pale cream colour called ‘bone’. It makes a nice change from black and looks less like a camera bag. I’ve been using the bag for a few weeks and I’ve deliberately not been precious with it. I’ve put it down on the floor of my car and in cafes etc, and so far it still looks nice and clean. It will be interesting to see how it fairs over the coming months. I’ll update this review to keep you posted.

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