We’ve still got some more shooting and image analysis to go but we thought we’d share this gallery of Fuji GFX 50S raw files after 5 minutes in Photoshop. The 50Mp images have been processed in Adobe Camera Raw, with less than 5 minutes being spent on each.

The long exposure images that have been converted to monochrome have had the heaviest processing, but it still took less than 5 minutes. We’ve also included colour versions for comparison. These images were shot in daylight using a Lee Filters Big Stopper to reduce the shutter speed to 30 and 40 seconds. The GFX 50S’s Wi-Fi connectivity proved it’s worth as a remote controller with live view.

If you follow the link to our Fuji GFX 50S raw files after 5 minutes in Photoshop Flickr album you can browse and download full resolution images to check for yourself.

7 hidden features of the Fuji GFX 50S you may not have known about

This gallery has images shot at from ISO 100 all the way up to ISO 12,800, the native maximum setting of the GFX 50S. Noise is controlled very well throughout the native sensitivity range, however, at 100% on-screen it’s possible to see a little texture in some areas of shots taken at ISO 800. Naturally pushing up the sensitivity setting results in more noise being present but even at ISO 12,800 it’s a subtle texture of luminance noise and there’s still plenty of detail visible. It’s a clear demonstration of the medium format advantage brought by the Fuji GFX.

I need to experiment with a wider variety of images, but initial findings suggest that you can get away with underexposing raw files by around 2EV and brighten them successfully post-capture.

Another bonus of using a camera with a sensor that measures 43.8mm x 32.9mm is the ability to restrict depth of field dramatically even at apertures such as f/4 and f/5.6. It allows you to isolate your subject nicely.

Fuji GFX 50S Raw File Image Gallery

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