An online campaign has begun to try to persuade Google to reverse its decision to not develop or update its Nik Collection photo editing software any further. The campaign has been launched by Sascha Rheker in Germany and uses the popular change.org petition system. Follow this link to add your name to the Petition to Save Nik Collection.

We reckon it’s a long shot, but the Nik Collection has been very popular with photographers but perhaps the corporate giant can be convinced that the software bundle has a viable (and profitable) future by a groundswell of interest from dedicated photographers.

The Nik Collection is made up of a bundle of separate software packages comprising Analog Efex Pro, Color Efex Pro, Silver Efex Pro, Viveza, HDR Efex Pro, Sharpener Pro and Dfine. While they all have their uses and produce great results, Silver Efex Pro which replicates the look of traditional black and white film emulsions has been especially popular. The clever U-Point technology is also very useful for making selective adjustments such as applying selective noise reduction in Define and selective sharpening in Sharpener Pro.

Adobe stops selling Creative Suite

Google bought Nik Software in 2012. The following year it announced that while the smartphone version of the popular Snapseed app would continue, the desktop version was to be killed-off. At first photographers hoped that the Nik Collection would continue to be developed but now it seems that unless Google can be persuaded otherwise, it too is set to dwindle and die.

Nikon 100th anniversary image competition opens for entries

When Google first bought Nik Collection it retailed for $500 and the price was dropped to $150 before becoming free of charge in 2016. It seems likely that Google will want to return to a purchase model if it is to continue with development and issuing updates. How much would you be prepared to pay for it?