After admitting it intentionally slows down older versions of its iPhone, Apple has now issued a public apology for the practice.

Apple made the admission after users on Reddit explained how their phones became much faster after replacing the battery. In response, Apple said it slows down older iPhones in order to prevent crashes.

Apple says it began the process in iOS 10.2.1 with the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6S, 6S Plus and SE.

The resulting uproar prompted a number of lawsuits around the world from users who claim that had they known a battery replacement would improve performance they wouldn’t have upgraded to a new phone.

In response to the uproar, Apple posted the following message on its website:

“We know that some of you feel Apple has let you down. We apologize.

“[W]e have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades.

“Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love, and making iPhones last as long as possible is an important part of that…

“All rechargeable batteries are consumable components that become less effective as they chemically age and their ability to hold a charge diminishes […] A chemically aged battery also becomes less capable of delivering peak energy loads, especially in a low state of charge, which may result in a device unexpectedly shutting itself down in some situations […]

“It should go without saying that we think sudden, unexpected shutdowns are unacceptable. We don’t want any of our users to lose a call, miss taking a picture or have any other part of their iPhone experience interrupted if we can avoid it […]”

Apple has also said it will cut the cost of a battery replacement from out-of-warranty iPhones 6 and above from $79 to $29 beginning this month. This price reduction will last through all of 2018.

What’s more, Apple is planning to launch an iOS update that will provide iPhone users with more information about their phone’s battery health.

Via PetaPixel

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